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How to block Outlook Anywhere but still allow Outlook Web Access?

Posted on 2012-03-09
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Last Modified: 2012-04-24
We use Exchange 2003/Windows 2003 in a front-end/back-end configuration. We have users who have their Outlook client configured to use "Outlook Anywhere", which is RPC over SSL. This enables them to get their corporate email without needing a VPN connection when working remotely. We also have some users that use "Outlook Web Access", which allows them to get their corporate email in a web browser, also using SSL. We now want to stop users from using Outlook Anywhere but still allow them to use Outlook Web Access. We do not use client certificates.

Is this possible to accomplish? If so, how?
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Question by:robw24
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7 Comments
 
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Alan Hardisty earned 500 total points
ID: 37702622
The simplest way is to restrict access in IIS to the RPC virtual directory by IP address and only allow access from the Server's internal IP address.
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Author Comment

by:robw24
ID: 37702656
I'm confused a little with your answer because we have the front-end and back-end servers, and I don't know which ones you refer to.
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Expert Comment

by:Alan Hardisty
ID: 37702667
Change the Front-End server settings and set it to only allow access from itself (by IP).
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Author Comment

by:robw24
ID: 37702702
Thanks, that makes sense. May I ask though, why not just disable RPC altogether on the front-end server?
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Expert Comment

by:Alan Hardisty
ID: 37702902
There are many ways to skin a cat!

That would be another option - more difficult and less easily reversed, but doable.
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Author Comment

by:robw24
ID: 37886446
I assume not, but this should not affect smart phones from using active-sync against the front-end server, correct?
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Expert Comment

by:Alan Hardisty
ID: 37886722
Correct.  Different methods of communication, so shouldn't be an issue.
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