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Adding non-domain zone to DNS

I have a server 2003 DC/DNS server that is used for my school domain.  I would like to add an A record for a non domain server.  If I go to add just a record, it will give it a FQDN of the domain.  It looks like I need to add a new zone to the server.  Is this correct?  What would be the wizard settings for doing this?  I would call the Zone "Other".
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smantz
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smantz
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sarasotamacIT ManagerCommented:
You could get the fqdn from the server not in domain. Right click computer and properties and use that.
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DrDave242Commented:
Yes, you would need to add a new zone to the server.  Since you're only wanting to add a host record for one particular machine, create a forward lookup zone with the name of that machine's FQDN.  (For example, if the non-domain machine's FQDN is www.remote-domain.com, create a forward lookup zone called www.remote-domain.com.)  Then, inside that zone, create a host record and leave its name blank.  Give it the IP address of that non-domain machine, and you're set.  The resulting record will have the name "(same as parent folder)," indicating that the record's name is the name of the domain (which in this case is the name of the non-domain machine you're wanting to add).

Test it by pinging that machine's FQDN.  It should resolve to the address you put in the host record.
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smantzDirector of TechnologyAuthor Commented:
That makes sense however:
The server is in the windows default "workgroup".  I may have other machines down the road that are in that workgroup or other workgroups that I may want to have "A records" for.  Does this mean you would create a zone for each based on their FQDN or what?
Thanks for everything
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footechCommented:
When a machine is just part of a workgroup, it doesn't really have a FQDN.  You should be able to reach the machine just by using its NetBIOS name (e.g. "server1").  It's also not a problem to create an entry for the machine in the Forward Lookup Zone for your domain.  Just add the A record for whatever name and enter in the correct IP.

If you create a new forward lookup zone for workgroup computers, you should still be able to reach the machine either by using the NetBIOS name, or the whatever full FQDN that you create for it, but when using the FQDN then you would have to remember to use whatever different domain name ending (e.g. "other-domain.local").

Not sure why you would want to go through this however.  Why not just add it to the domain?  And even if you don't want/can't go that route, is NetBIOS name resolution not working for you?
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smantzDirector of TechnologyAuthor Commented:
I am test a backup product called "StoreGrid"  When running the client pieces and trying to connect to the server or one another to register, I have to use the ip address to make the connection.  I guess it is not using netbios to resolve names; just a guess.
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footechCommented:
It may not be important, but the software itself probably doesn't care what type of resolution is carried out (NetBIOS, DNS, or even HOSTS file), just that an IP is returned.  You may want to check that NetBIOS isn't disabled for the network adapter and that the computer browser service is started.  Or you can skip that and just go for the DNS as you started doing.
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