Solved

Lion 10.7.3 mapping drives to Widows Server

Posted on 2012-03-09
9
1,673 Views
Last Modified: 2012-03-25
I have a 2008 AD with a couple 2003 servers. I recently entered a Mac Mini server with Lion 10.7.3. I now have Macs (also with 10.7.3) able to login with AD users and their redirected drive seems to work on the Macs that they pull from AD.

The question I have is how can I have the Macs print and have a couple mapped drives show up?  

1) If I install the printers with local admin account on the Mac will they show up for all users on the network?

2) Is there a Mac or Win script that can run?

3) What roll does the Mac Mini play? I assume I needed that to make the initial connection between AD and the Macs?

4) What ideally is the best way to setup network printers on the Mac?
0
Comment
Question by:SKol1010
  • 4
  • 3
  • 2
9 Comments
 
LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:robertcerny
ID: 37708610
1] You can install network printers on the Mac Mini and re-share them for macs, but the question is why would you do it and not print to them directly

2] script doing what exactly?

3] Your setup is called "golden triangle". Mac Mini is bound to AD, acting as it's slave for password authentication. Client Macs then connect to Mac Mini, which should offer extended mac based services for authenticated users. For example in case of file server mac clients can use Spotlight searching on network volumes etc. However those volumes need to be local for Mac Mini.

4] Forget Print Server and set up network printers individually on each client. Use ARD to distribute settings
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:JonyHolt
ID: 37712813
You're going to want to use Workgroup Manager from the Admin Server tools from Apple. From WGM you can authenticate to the AD or OD if you created one. Under the "Preferences" button of the user you selected you can choose Printers, settings etc. For instance, you can select printers found by the Lion server and add them into the Printer's available for this user etc.

I would suggest actually managing the workstations from the server by binding them to the server so you can manage these services.
0
 

Author Comment

by:SKol1010
ID: 37712975
You can install network printers on the Mac Mini and re-share them for macs, but the question is why would you do it and not print to them directly? I want to automate the process. I am going to image the Mac clients and thought if I setup a printer once, users would have the printers all ready to go. Setup directly? Wouldn't users have to install the printer each time?

2] script doing what exactly? I would like to map two network share drives that show up on the Mac desktop and setup two printers.

3] Your setup is called "golden triangle". Mac Mini is bound to AD, acting as it's slave for password authentication. Client Macs then connect to Mac Mini, which should offer extended mac based services for authenticated users. For example in case of file server mac clients can use Spotlight searching on network volumes etc. However those volumes need to be local for Mac Mini. Should I map them on the Mac mini and share them from that?

4] Forget Print Server and set up network printers individually on each client. Use ARD to distribute settings.
What is ARD?
0
Does Powershell have you tied up in knots?

Managing Active Directory does not always have to be complicated.  If you are spending more time trying instead of doing, then it's time to look at something else. For nearly 20 years, AD admins around the world have used one tool for day-to-day AD management: Hyena. Discover why

 

Author Comment

by:SKol1010
ID: 37712985
I would suggest actually managing the workstations from the server by binding them to the server so you can manage these services. So bind the Mac clients to the AD or the Mac Mini?  Right now the Mac clients seem to all have the ability to login with their AD user name.
0
 
LVL 2

Expert Comment

by:JonyHolt
ID: 37713141
The mac clients can be bound to the AD. As long as the OSX Server is bound to the AD as well and you give the OSX server the ability to administrate inside of SBS 2003/2008 you can then use workgroup manager from any mac machine to administrate these settings with the AD admin password.

ARD = Apple Remote Desktop. It has the ability to set tasks to machines you are managing like install package examplepackage.pkg to MacMini01 MacMini02... and so on. Its a very useful tool in a mac admin's arsenal. However it is <400$. :(
0
 
LVL 10

Expert Comment

by:robertcerny
ID: 37713315
Actually, as I wrote already, this kind of setup is used to extend options for mac clients which are not possible in AD. For example to manage preferences such a network settings, login-logout hooks etc you need to bind your clients to OS X Server. If you're interested in a pure authentication, then AD only binding is sufficient.
If you're going to image clients, you have almost half of the work done, since you can control printers setup, install needed drivers etc.
So to recap, bind your mini server to AD and the clients to it. Control mac preferences, "map" drives. Use preinstalled images or use ARD to distribute settings between clients.
0
 

Author Comment

by:SKol1010
ID: 37722598
Thanks for all your advice but what does Control mac preferences, "map" drives mean? Are you saying control mapped drives through Mac Preferences?

bind your mini server to AD and the clients to it.
Do you mean bind my Mac clients to the Mac server or both or just AD. I want to control my settings and I don't mind doing through the Mac if I can. I just wasn't sure how to map drives to the Windows Server on the Mac. Thanks again!
0
 
LVL 10

Accepted Solution

by:
robertcerny earned 500 total points
ID: 37723640
Well,
usually admin deploy mac server into their network to ease administration of Mac OS X based clients. You can do it using AD but it's not straightforward and you actually need to change AD scheme, which admins don't want to do.
The golden triangle setup which I mentioned in my previous post works other way - it lets you have all users, groups and their passwords on one server (AD) and the mac server acts as an authorization trampoline. In this scenario users accounts remain on AD server and mac server extends their options with mac based features. So since implementing this scenario you are able to do similar stuff as with Windows clients bound to AD - control settings of clients, make network homes etc.
To map drives or maybe auto-connect network volumes you have two options. You can create automount points or simply control "Login items" of the user and add a shared volume there. This setting is then pushed to client from the server in login time.
I would recommend you to go at least a few basic docs available on Apple website
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:SKol1010
ID: 37763791
I am working with Apple but they say you can't map drives. I am using workgroup manager with augmented users so I don't affect my AD. Would love more info on login items to map drives if you have it.
0

Featured Post

Enterprise Mobility and BYOD For Dummies

Like “For Dummies” books, you can read this in whatever order you choose and learn about mobility and BYOD; and how to put a competitive mobile infrastructure in place. Developed for SMBs and large enterprises alike, you will find helpful use cases, planning, and implementation.

Question has a verified solution.

If you are experiencing a similar issue, please ask a related question

We could spend the next millennium discussing the differences of the Mac and Windows platforms. The next century will continue to have fanatics on both side of the equation and neither side will win the war. However, that’s not why we are here. W…
This article outlines the process to identify and resolve account lockout in an Active Directory environment.
This tutorial will walk an individual through the steps necessary to join and promote the first Windows Server 2012 domain controller into an Active Directory environment running on Windows Server 2008. Determine the location of the FSMO roles by lo…
With the advent of Windows 10, Microsoft is pushing a Get Windows 10 icon into the notification area (system tray) of qualifying computers. There are many reasons for wanting to remove this icon. This two-part Experts Exchange video Micro Tutorial s…

792 members asked questions and received personalized solutions in the past 7 days.

Join the community of 500,000 technology professionals and ask your questions.

Join & Ask a Question