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Solution for 2 SBS servers in different locations sending / recieving email to the same domain name

One of my customers has two offices.

Each office runs SBS 2003 using Exchange 2003.

Both have their own domain names and can send/recieve mail directly (DNS).

Less than 15 users in total.

Customer has now introduced a single mail address (different to that on either of the SBS domains). MX for the new mail address points to a smarthost.

We need a system that allows the new mail address to be used on both servers.

At the moment I have it working  at Office 1 by:
Adding the new email address in AD and making it Primary.
Unticking - automatically update email addresses based on reciepient policy.

 Incoming mail is collected by a smart host and forwarded on to the original domain addesss on a per user basis.

Office 2 was set up by a different IT company who added the new domain name to reciepient policies.
They recieve mail by polling the smart host mailboxes using pop.

The setup works but is complicated and confusing to troubleshoot and manage.

I would like suggestions as to a better alternative.

All suggestions appreciated.

Regards,

Paul Arnell
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zoltan9992000
Asked:
zoltan9992000
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1 Solution
 
Abbas HaidarIT ManagerCommented:
How many mailboxes are assigned and setup with the new domain?
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zoltan9992000Author Commented:
Just checked -

19 Users in total

10 at Office 1
9 at Office 2
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zoltan9992000Author Commented:
Sorry but I don't see how this relates to my problem.

I want to streamline the mail flow so that the two SBS 2003 servers can send and recieve mail via a smarthost, using just one, new, domain name for mail.
This domain name is different to the domain names the servers were set up with.



9 of the users are in one office using one of the SBS servers.
10 of the users are located in a different office (5 miles away) using a different SBS server.

Hope this helps
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
Sadly the scenario you describe is directly contradictory to the licensing agreement for SBS. therefore EE use policies prevent us from giving you "workarounds" that violate SBS licensing.

If this were my client, I'd set up an SBS server at the office with more users and/or the better Internet connection, set up a standard server joined to the SBS domain as a RODC and branch cache at the second site, and set up Outlook Anywhere for email access from the remote site. A fully supported, legally licensed topology, easier management, better user experience...

-Cliff
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Abbas HaidarIT ManagerCommented:
I got your points and execuse my miss-understanding, I thought you wanna go for another solution outside SBS.
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zoltan9992000Author Commented:
Sorry - why is the scenario

"directly contradictory to the licensing agreement for SBS"

If this is the case I really need to know what that is.

Both SBS servers are legally purchased with extra cals etc.

Please elaborate.

Excellent alternative suggested - I'll look further into that - the current kit is old and your suggestion looks like an ideal replacement solution.


I take you would have a site to site VPN.

RODC = read only domain controller ? Is this the same as a backup domain controller ?

When using outlook anywhere would you point it to the SBS server's wan ip or can you point it to the server via the VPN ?

Thanks Cliff

Thanks for you input absi81
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
The licensing agreement is one SBS server per legal organization/entity. Otherwise larger businesses could (and would) set up an SBS server for their marketing department, another for their sales, a third for their support, etc. the SBS team also tries to put technical barriers to make such abuse impractical, and that is what you are beginning to bump into, but those technical barriers don't guarantee lack of abuse, they just try to stem it.

A site to site VPN would be a good option, yes.

Yes, RODC is a read only domain controller. There is no such thing as a "backup" domain controller in Active Directory. All DCs are active. But in branch offices, RODCs make sense as they can handle login requests more quickly than traversing the VPN, but don't need write permissions as all administration still occurs centrally.

As far as outlook goes, either will work. OA is designed for WAN workloads though, so I usually set up branch offices to point to the SBS WAN IP. Better bandwidth usage than RPC over a VPN.

-Cliff
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zoltan9992000Author Commented:
Great answer Cliff

I was looking for a long term solution with new kit and this will do nicely.

I am closing the question now as it is answered but I would like your opinion on hosting Exchange on "the cloud".

Is this a something you would reccomend or reccomend to avoid ?

Thanks
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