Treadmill Equivalent To Reality ?

Suppose I use a treadmill set to 3 mph, with an incline of 15 degrees for 10 minutes.
I then go to a 15 degree hill and walk for 10 minutes at 3 mph.
Are the two scenarios above roughly equivalent in terms of exercise and energy expended?

What I'm really wondering is, if the ascent (i.e. the height I have to lift my body weight) on the treadmill is the same as on the road. It's supposed to be, but is it really ?
LVL 24
EirmanChief Operations ManagerAsked:
Who is Participating?
I wear a lot of hats...

"The solutions and answers provided on Experts Exchange have been extremely helpful to me over the last few years. I wear a lot of hats - Developer, Database Administrator, Help Desk, etc., so I know a lot of things but not a lot about one thing. Experts Exchange gives me answers from people who do know a lot about one thing, in a easy to use platform." -Todd S.

d-glitchCommented:
As far as gravitational potential energy is concerned, yes.

Assume your treadmill is 0.5 miles long and running at 3 mph.
If you start at the top and stand still for 10 minutes you will be at the bottom.
You will have to walk 0.5 miles up the 15 degree incline to get back to where you started.

Wind resistance and cooling are different on a treadmill than a real hill.
0
d-glitchCommented:
In both cases the vertical climb is

    (3 mi/hr) * (sin 15) * (10 min) * (1 hr/60 min) *( 5280 ft/mi)  =  683 feet
0
EirmanChief Operations ManagerAuthor Commented:
The treadmill always seems somewhat easier than real life to me.

Say you take a step forward with your right leg, then the motor brings your right leg back (doing some of the work ??) while you bring your left foot forward .... etc etc.

Is It an illusion that the treadmill seems to be doing some of the work for me ?
0
Cloud Class® Course: MCSA MCSE Windows Server 2012

This course teaches how to install and configure Windows Server 2012 R2.  It is the first step on your path to becoming a Microsoft Certified Solutions Expert (MCSE).

d-glitchCommented:
If you are hold on to the rails or console, then the treadmill is supporting some of your weight and helping with your balance.  This is energy that you don't have to expend.

If you don't touch the treadmill with anything but your feet, you are doing all the work.
0
d-glitchCommented:
The treadmill is really moving you downhill at 3 mph.
You have to climb at the same rate to maintain your position.
0

Experts Exchange Solution brought to you by

Your issues matter to us.

Facing a tech roadblock? Get the help and guidance you need from experienced professionals who care. Ask your question anytime, anywhere, with no hassle.

Start your 7-day free trial
EirmanChief Operations ManagerAuthor Commented:
Thanks
0
It's more than this solution.Get answers and train to solve all your tech problems - anytime, anywhere.Try it for free Edge Out The Competitionfor your dream job with proven skills and certifications.Get started today Stand Outas the employee with proven skills.Start learning today for free Move Your Career Forwardwith certification training in the latest technologies.Start your trial today
Math / Science

From novice to tech pro — start learning today.

Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.