ESX - Insufficient disk space on datastore

Good morning experts.

I am having a problem adding a virtual drive to a VM running Windows Server 2008 R2. I have a new raid volume in the server. In the Virtual Infrastructure Client, I was able to add a storage volume (configuration>storage) and it is currently showing Capacity - 544.25 GB, Free - 543.63 GB.

The target VM is running Windows Server 2008 R2. The VM is shut down when I go into Edit Settings to add another Hard Drive to it. I click Add>Hard Disk and go thru the wizard:
     - Create a new virtual disk
     - Enter 500 GB as disk size
     - Click Specify a datastore and select that new 544 GB datastore
     - I leave Virtual Device Node at its default setting SCSI (0:1)
     - I do not change anything under Mode

I click Next and Finish, and then Ok to add the drive, but get the error Insufficient disk space on datastore. I'm guessing there is some silly setting I'm missing someplace since this raid volume was just rebuilt, initialized, etc. Should be totally empty. What am I doing wrong?

Thanks in advance for your help.
ohfaceAsked:
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Reduce the size of the Virtual Disk you are trying to create.

try 400GB.

500GB is very close to the max size of your 544GB datastore.
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ohfaceAuthor Commented:
Same result with 400 GB and 300 GB. For giggles, I tried a 100 GB and it worked. This made me go back and look at how I configured the storage volume when I created it. I had selected Max File Size: 256 GB Block Size: 1 MB. Duh. I removed that storage volume and recreated it with Max File Size: 512 GB and Block Size: 2 MB. I was able to create add the 500 GB, though I'm going to go back an recreate it with 20% left free.

@hanccocka - The size didn't fix it, but it lead me to the fix. Thanks for the help.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
• 1MB block size – 256GB maximum file size
• 2MB block size – 512GB maximum file size
• 4MB block size – 1024GB maximum file size
• 8MB block size – 2048GB maximum file size

No issues, with ESXi 5.0, 1MB block size can handle 2048GB maximum file size
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ohfaceAuthor Commented:
I'm running v3, and the 1mb block wouldn't let me create anything bigger than 256 GB.
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Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Correct. But if this is an issue, VMFS5, ESXi 5.0 new features 1MB can now support 2TB.
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ohfaceAuthor Commented:
Nice. Thanks for the info.
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ohfaceAuthor Commented:
Hanccocka's comment wasn't the solution, but lead me to find the solution on my own.
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