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Use CHMOD To Allow Read, Write and Execute Permissions Recursively

Posted on 2012-03-12
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Last Modified: 2012-03-28
Hello,

I'm going to tar up a few directories and scripts and I want to apply the chmod a+w+x to all files under the main directory and have those permissions apply recursively.  Is there a way to do that with chmod?  I know how to change and individual script file, but I tried chmod a+w+x and it didn't allow access to all users.  I want to do this and then tar it up so that the person who untars it can run everything.  Thanks for the help!  This is for Linux 32 bit OS.
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Question by:cgray1223
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7 Comments
 
LVL 30

Accepted Solution

by:
Randy Downs earned 668 total points
ID: 37713171
Try
chmod -R 777 /maindirectory/*.ext
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LVL 11

Assisted Solution

by:rowansmith
rowansmith earned 668 total points
ID: 37713176
Use the number values instead

So chmod 777 = rwxrwxrwx
chmod 677 = rw-rwxrwx
chmod 477 = r--rwxrwx
chmod 177 = --xrwxrwx

In each case the 7 is made up of:

4 = r (read)
2 = w (write)
1 = x (execute)

So chmod 755 filename would result in rwxr-xr-x

Which is what you need if you want anyone to be able to execute a script (read and write)

Likewise chmod 700 filename will result in rwx------

See this link for further details.
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Assisted Solution

by:ishanjrana
ishanjrana earned 664 total points
ID: 37713251
4 = r (read)
2 = w (write)
1 = x (execute)

chmod 777 /abc/f1.txt       -----owner has read,write,execute permission on f1
                                                 -----group has read,write,execute permission on f1
                                                 ------others has read,write,execute permission on f1


chmod 753 /abc/f1.txt       -----owner has read,write,execute permission on f1
                                                 -----group has read,execute permission on f1
                                                 ------others has write,execute permission on f1


chmod 721 /abc/f1.txt       -----owner has read,write,execute permission on f1
                                                 -----group has write permission on f1
                                                 ------others has execute permission on f1


chmod 760 /abc/f1.txt       -----owner has read,write,execute permission on f1
                                                 -----group has read,write permission on f1
                                                 ------others has no permission on f1
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LVL 68

Expert Comment

by:woolmilkporc
ID: 37713824
Don't modify your existing files, that's unnecessary and can even be dangerous from a security perspective.

Have tar modify the permissions during the archival process, so only the archived files will get the new settings.

tar --mode 777 -cvf archive.tar /source/spec

This works also using the symbolic notation:

tar --mode a=rwx -cvf archive.tar /source/spec

You can even change the owner of the files during archival ("--owner userid").

wmp
0
 

Author Comment

by:cgray1223
ID: 37715256
@woolmilkporc - Is there any way to change the permissions to the  -owner userid when the user is untarring the tar ball?
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LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:Randy Downs
ID: 37715322
Try this

http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/how-to-use-chmod-and-chown-command/

For example following command will setup user and group ownership to root user only for /backup directory:
# chown root:root /backup
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LVL 68

Expert Comment

by:woolmilkporc
ID: 37715353
No, unfortunately there isn't, and even if it were possible - you must be root to change a file's owner anyway.
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