Use CHMOD To Allow Read, Write and Execute Permissions Recursively

Hello,

I'm going to tar up a few directories and scripts and I want to apply the chmod a+w+x to all files under the main directory and have those permissions apply recursively.  Is there a way to do that with chmod?  I know how to change and individual script file, but I tried chmod a+w+x and it didn't allow access to all users.  I want to do this and then tar it up so that the person who untars it can run everything.  Thanks for the help!  This is for Linux 32 bit OS.
cgray1223Asked:
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Randy DownsOWNERCommented:
Try
chmod -R 777 /maindirectory/*.ext
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rowansmithCommented:
Use the number values instead

So chmod 777 = rwxrwxrwx
chmod 677 = rw-rwxrwx
chmod 477 = r--rwxrwx
chmod 177 = --xrwxrwx

In each case the 7 is made up of:

4 = r (read)
2 = w (write)
1 = x (execute)

So chmod 755 filename would result in rwxr-xr-x

Which is what you need if you want anyone to be able to execute a script (read and write)

Likewise chmod 700 filename will result in rwx------

See this link for further details.
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ishanjranaCommented:
4 = r (read)
2 = w (write)
1 = x (execute)

chmod 777 /abc/f1.txt       -----owner has read,write,execute permission on f1
                                                 -----group has read,write,execute permission on f1
                                                 ------others has read,write,execute permission on f1


chmod 753 /abc/f1.txt       -----owner has read,write,execute permission on f1
                                                 -----group has read,execute permission on f1
                                                 ------others has write,execute permission on f1


chmod 721 /abc/f1.txt       -----owner has read,write,execute permission on f1
                                                 -----group has write permission on f1
                                                 ------others has execute permission on f1


chmod 760 /abc/f1.txt       -----owner has read,write,execute permission on f1
                                                 -----group has read,write permission on f1
                                                 ------others has no permission on f1
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woolmilkporcCommented:
Don't modify your existing files, that's unnecessary and can even be dangerous from a security perspective.

Have tar modify the permissions during the archival process, so only the archived files will get the new settings.

tar --mode 777 -cvf archive.tar /source/spec

This works also using the symbolic notation:

tar --mode a=rwx -cvf archive.tar /source/spec

You can even change the owner of the files during archival ("--owner userid").

wmp
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cgray1223Author Commented:
@woolmilkporc - Is there any way to change the permissions to the  -owner userid when the user is untarring the tar ball?
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Randy DownsOWNERCommented:
Try this

http://www.cyberciti.biz/faq/how-to-use-chmod-and-chown-command/

For example following command will setup user and group ownership to root user only for /backup directory:
# chown root:root /backup
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woolmilkporcCommented:
No, unfortunately there isn't, and even if it were possible - you must be root to change a file's owner anyway.
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