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Getting "Access Denied" error on files

Posted on 2012-03-14
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Last Modified: 2012-04-10
I have a computer with two partitions on the hard drive.  I recently backed up everything to one partition and reinstalled Windows 7 on the other one.  Everything went well, but now there are some JPEG files which seem to be locked for the entire system.  They won't even show a thumbnail, and I can't move them or manipulate them in any way.  I had two copies of these files in different places, and the same thing happened to both sets, but no other files that I've found.  The folders containing these files are fine, as well as other contents

 I have checked the permissions and ownership, and everything looks just the same as all the other files in the folder.  Yet I always get an error saying "Access Denied," or that I need administrative rights to access them (I am the administrator).

The only thing I can think of is that maybe NTFS had the files physically saved only on the C partition (which is now formatted and reinstalled), but I had copies on the D partition for months beforehand, and I thought the partitions would always be held separate.  Is this a possible explanation, or does anyone have any suggestions as to how I can get these files back?
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Question by:Tomasz Czyz
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13 Comments
 
LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:thomasdavis
ID: 37719936
I understand your the administrator but what is the actual account name your logged in as? Once you find the name on the account take ownership of the file with the logged on account then change permission and add your account name to the file.  See if that resolves the issue.
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LVL 9

Expert Comment

by:Ashok Dewan
ID: 37719960
If you have done this, then look the following
I want you to change the ownership of the files, give the ownership to administrator and then change the permission to full access. then you can move the files ot other location. otherwise
you can also try by system account http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/sysinternals/bb897553

psexec -s copy *.jpeg d:\anyfolder
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LVL 4

Expert Comment

by:sivanov
ID: 37719988
:-)  - No NTSF can not do such magic.
Did you try to took ownership of the root folder,  as Thomasdavis already suggest.?
dont give up - there plenty of fancy things which might help :-). "secedit"is one of thme. but there should be an easier way.
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LVL 2

Author Comment

by:Tomasz Czyz
ID: 37719994
No dice - I've given my account explicit ownership and explicit full-control.  And my account is the only one on the computer.  I think I may have found a clue, though.  All the locked files are marked as being encrypted, with permissions given to my old user (a domain user, as opposed to my current local user).

I don't know why the files would be encrypted (I certainly never did so deliberately), but that offers a more logical and more hopeful explanation.  Is there any way I can break this encryption, short of temporarily rejoining my computer to the domain and logging on with my old user to remove the encryption?
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LVL 30

Expert Comment

by:ded9
ID: 37719995
Take ownership of the folder where all the data is backed up.

Follow this article ....try it again

http://www.blogsdna.com/2159/how-to-take-ownership-grant-permissions-to-access-files-folder-in-windows-7.htm




Ded9
0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:Tomasz Czyz
ID: 37720061
Thanks, sivanov, I was hoping I wouldn't have to revise my entire mental picture of how file systems work. :)
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LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:thomasdavis
ID: 37720068
Once you take ownership of the file/folder location (if you do this to the folder make sure to apply to all objects in container)  and are able to open it, do a "save as" and change the file name. This will apply your new account to the file permission etc..
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LVL 8

Expert Comment

by:thomasdavis
ID: 37720091
If encrypted open properties on the file click on advance button uncheck encrypt contents click ok.  See if that fixes it.
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LVL 2

Author Comment

by:Tomasz Czyz
ID: 37720220
thomasdavies - If it was that easy, it would have been done a while ago. :-)  I get an Access Denied error, presumably because the only encryption certificate on there is from my old domain user.  I never exported the certificate, because I didn't think I had any encrypted files.  Let that be a lesson to me about assuming things... :-)

Here's my current plan: I join my computer into the old domain, log on with my old domain user and remove the encryption from there.  Then remove the computer from the domain again.


Does anyone have any reasons why this wouldn't work, or a less complicated solution?
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LVL 8

Assisted Solution

by:thomasdavis
thomasdavis earned 250 total points
ID: 37720335
Yea i figured but its always good to double check things. well when you create a encryption it saves the thumbprint cert to the computer, if the old drive is where the cert was and now you no longer have it, it could still be an issue but its worth a try.
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LVL 4

Accepted Solution

by:
sivanov earned 250 total points
ID: 37728887
:-) .....guys what about ataching the HDD to PC which is already joined to the DC and log in with the needed credentials ?
0
 
LVL 2

Author Comment

by:Tomasz Czyz
ID: 37781641
I'll have to chance to test both solutions over Easter weekend.  Will post the results here.
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LVL 2

Author Closing Comment

by:Tomasz Czyz
ID: 37815659
Ok, here's what ended up happening:

I was able to get the files again from another person, but was still unable to delete the encrypted ones from my harddisk.  Everything was completely locked down.

Today I went back to my old office, logged into a computer with my domain user and connected my hard drive to a reader.  I was still unable to read the files, but interestingly enough, I was able to delete them.  Since this was enough for me, I decided to skip joining my computer to the domain.  Would have been interesting to find out if logging into the original computer would have given me full access, but I didn't want to clutter up my nice, clean OS installation.  Thanks folks for your help and idea-bouncing.
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