Issue with Digital Certificate for IIS on XP for development purposes

Dear Experts,

I have an issue related to the above subject title.

My requirement is that I need to sign a message using the Private Key and verify it's authenticity using the Public Key. And also there's a possibility in the tool that the message could be encrypted by the Public Key and decrypted by the Private Key.

The code is done on a VS 2010 solution (C#.Net; web application) in my development environment which is a Win XP running IIS 6. Now, to test this application, I need the Private Key and Public Key. So, I did the following:

1. I requested for a digital certificate from my machine's IIS server.

2. I received the following from our IT operations divition: a ".der" file, a ".p7b" file, two ".pem" files

3. Using MMC I installed the ".p7b" file (which corresponds to the public key, i guess) under Certificates (Local Computer) --> Personal --> Certificates. This action was successful.

4. I opened the newly installed certificate which shows it's details on a Certificate dialog box.

But, the problem is that it does not show the Private Key on that dialog box.

How to get the Private Key there?

Thanks a lot for your support.
sramakrishnanAsked:
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arnoldCommented:
It all depends on the type of certificate that was issued.
The der, pem and p7b are mere formats in which keys can be passed.
There are references to using OpenSSL to convert one format into others.
Using a text editor, notepad open the der/pem format keys to see whether one of them says/includes the private key.

Depending on how IT generate certificates, you need a pfx with the private key included.

You could use OpenSSL to create a CSR and provided to IT for them to sign and provide you the signed certificate to which you have the private key (from the csr generation).
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