Wireless USB

I have a wireless D-Link USB 802.11N connection that periodically will drop the network connection and label the device as disabled.  If you right click on the coonection and try to enable it, it ssays connection failed.

I have another such device connected to another computer in the office and it has never dropped a connection.  So I swapped the devices and the offending computer still exhibits the behavior.

The malfunctioning computer is using Windows XP professional with the latest SP and updates.  The only way to resolve the issue for now is to reboot.  The connection will work for a period of time and fail again.

Any help will be appreciated.
Thanks,
Terry
contechcorpAsked:
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Dave BaldwinFixer of ProblemsCommented:
What happens if you remove it and then plug it back in?
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Darr247Commented:
Try totally uninstalling the driver from your computer.

First, download the latest driver for the adapter so you have it on hand
http://www.dlink.com/support/
You didn't tell us which adapter you have, so that's as close as I can get you.


To fully uninstall all instances of the driver, follow this procedure

Click Start->Run, cmd [Enter]
In the Command Window that opens, run
SET DEVMGR_SHOW_NONPRESENT_DEVICES=1
Leave that window open, but minimize it.

Now, *with the USB adapter plugged in*...
Click Start->Run, devmgmt.msc [Enter]

expand Network adapters and note the adapters present.

Click View and select Show hidden devices.

Without the variable made in the first part of the procedure, all Show hidden devices shows is missing non-Plug & Play devices; adding the environment variable makes it show ghosted Plug & Play devices, also.

Right-click on the D-Link adapter and choose Uninstall (the current instance will be a slightly bolder icon and type; if any other instances of the adapter exist, the icon/type will be a lighter color... that's where the 'ghosted' name comes from).
Click Yes/Continue, if prompted.
When that's done, repeat the Uninstall step on any ghosted instances of that USB adapter, too. The ghosted instances also have a driver associated with them, and who knows what version they are (if you have upgraded the driver previously, there could be numerous versions mixed together)... windows won't actually remove the driver[s] as long as those ghosted instances still exist.

Unplug the USB adapter, close the Command Prompt window and reboot the computer.

Run the installation file for the newest driver and do not plug in the USB adapter until prompted to do so (that will keep windows from self-installing an earlier driver), or after it's done, if the installer never prompts you to insert the adapter.
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Aaron TomoskySD-WAN SimplifiedCommented:
In device manager, right click, properties, uncheck "allow windows to turn off this device to save power" or any other power saving settings
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andrewmccCommented:
Could be a faulty usb port, try a different usb port.
Also check what bios options are set in the bios.
Windows has power management settings for wifi and network devices, goto control panel, via power management, goto advanced options and check each individual one to full power or check one setting at a time.
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contechcorpAuthor Commented:
Removing the wireless plug in and re-seating it does nothing. When this problem happens, it totally disables the device. And, it would seem, you can only enable it by rebooting.  I have tried this with every available USB port on this computer, and it still exhibits the same behavior.  Sorry about getting back so late about this problem..I had some family matters to attend to.  I will check powere settings for the USB ports or check the windows settings for device manager.

Thanks,
Terry
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Darr247Commented:
Did you try uninstalling it as I suggested in http:#a37727892 ?
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contechcorpAuthor Commented:
DAR247:

I have to admit, I did not attempt to uninstall the driver.  I will add that to my list of things to do.

Thanks,
Terry
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