SQL 2008 R2 instances will only connect with named pipes not TCP/IP

I have a new installation of SQL 20082 running on SBS 2011 premium. 2 installed applications will not connect via TCP/IP we need to create an OBDC data connector with named pipes.  These applications connected in the old SQL server.  DNS seems to work OK.  This box is SBS 2011 Premium and SQL is installed on that servernot a second server.  

Note: this may be a licesing problem.  When I look at the properties on my computer is lists this as Windows SBS 2011 standard not Premium.  I have a primium license key not I am not sure where to enter it.
BlueGloryAsked:
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Cliff GaliherCommented:
It isn't a censing issue, and note that there is notice thing as SBS 2011 Premium edition. There is a premium add-on, but as the name implies, it "adds on" to standard edition, so when you check the version, SBS will Report standard edition (to differentiate it from SBS essentials) but never premium.

Your problem mayy be one of two things:

1) you have not set up the appropriate exceptions in windows firewall. the premium add-on comes with a second windows server license for a reason. SQL server chooses a RANDOM port to listen in on (but can be forced if necessary) and the SQL helper service helps clients locate the proper port for an instance. A domain controller, conversely, should not be listening in random ports as this is a significant security risk. As such, the firewall policies of a default DC install are directly interfering with how SQL operates. You can define exceptions (usually through group policy) but know that doing so adds SIGNIFICANT risk to your server. Which brings me full circle to the PAO including a second server license for a reason. You REALLY SHOIOD run any network SQL app on the second server, I can't stress this enough.

2) less common, but still possible, is if you didn't enable TCP/IP via the SQL server management. You must choose the instance, enable TCP/IP, and bind it to an interface (it defaults to localhost) or it won't be listening on an interface that the client can reach. You can check to see if it is working and listening with netstat and other process monitoring tools such as those I the sysinternals toolkit.

-Cliff
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BlueGloryAuthor Commented:
We are considering getting a second server for SQL but until then I need to get this going. I you give me more insight on how to configure the group policy for random port exceptions.
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BlueGloryAuthor Commented:
We installed the second instance successfully
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BlueGloryAuthor Commented:
non
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BlueGloryAuthor Commented:
We successfully installed a second instance
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Microsoft SQL Server 2008

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