• Status: Solved
  • Priority: Medium
  • Security: Public
  • Views: 697
  • Last Modified:

Virtual Machine doesn't show E: drive

I have a virtual machine that is not showing my E: drive that is defined in machine settings.
I attached the same .VHD to another virtual machine on the same Hyper-V host, and it mounts up just fine. I can explorer it and see all the files. This suggests to me that the .VHD file itself is OK.

The Virtual Machine that won't display the E: drive is a Windows 2000 instance.  The VM that does display the E: drive happens to be a Windows 7 instance.  

When I boot the VM with a ShadowProtect .ISO disk and run Storage Craft Shadow Protect, the VM doesn't show the E: drive then, either.  That seems really odd.

I'm working in a Windows Server 2008 R2 Host environment.
Both the C: disk .VHD and the E: disk .VHD were created by Acronis by converting backup files to .VHD files.  Both the C: disk and the E: disk are presently dynamic .VHD files. Both are less than 68gb in size.  

My overall goal is to upgrade the application that is on the E: drive to a new version of the operating system, with a data conversion from a proprietary database to a SQL database.  I had planned to virtualize the old server and the new server in the same host box, and then do the upgrade/conversion.  I need the data to show up on the old box, and for that, I need it to show me drive E:
0
studios
Asked:
studios
  • 3
2 Solutions
 
comnutsCommented:
Please run this command on the drive in Windows 7 and post your results here. You will need to run command prompt as an administrator.

fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo E:

I'm suspecting it to be a NTFS version issue.
0
 
studiosAuthor Commented:
C:\Windows\system32>fsutil fsinfo ntfsinfo e:
NTFS Volume Serial Number :       0x8278949d78949211
Version :                         3.1
Number Sectors :                  0x0000000006193f60
Total Clusters :                  0x0000000000c327ec
Free Clusters  :                  0x00000000002e6cd9
Total Reserved :                  0x0000000000000000
Bytes Per Sector  :               512
Bytes Per Cluster :               4096
Bytes Per FileRecord Segment    : 1024
Clusters Per FileRecord Segment : 0
Mft Valid Data Length :           0x000000000b5b4000
Mft Start Lcn  :                  0x0000000000000002
Mft2 Start Lcn :                  0x0000000000250259
Mft Zone Start :                  0x00000000006cbe60
Mft Zone End   :                  0x00000000006d8680
RM Identifier:        C91E92C2-704C-11E1-9A2E-806E6F6E6963
0
 
studiosAuthor Commented:
Apparently, Windows 2000 servers as VMs don't support the use of the Hyper-V SCSI driver, which is a virtual device.  So even though I have installed the Integration Services into the VM, it will never see a .VHD connected to any SCSI controller.

It doesn't explain why I wasn't seeing it on the virtualized Windows 2003 server.  Perhaps I haven't installed the Integration Services into that one - I thought I had.

So, my solution is to put it as the second drive on the first IDE controller.  When I've done that, it mounts right up and my application migration moves ahead.

For comnuts, I thought your suggestion was excellent, so while not exactly a solution to this problem, I propose to award points anyway.
0
 
studiosAuthor Commented:
Discovering that Windows 2000 doesn't allow the use of the Hyper-V virtual SCSI driver explained why I couldn't see any .VHD drives that were connected to that driver.
0
Question has a verified solution.

Are you are experiencing a similar issue? Get a personalized answer when you ask a related question.

Have a better answer? Share it in a comment.

Join & Write a Comment

  • 3
Tackle projects and never again get stuck behind a technical roadblock.
Join Now