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VBBRett asked on

How to Access Protected methods in C#

I was under the impression that it was plausible to accessing protected methods by deriving a new class by the class with the protected method..however, I am trying to use a method to add users with a certain GUID in C# and I am unable to access the GrantAccess methods that I am showing a link for below.  

http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/microsoft.sharepoint.administration.spdatabase.grantaccess.aspx

So, how do I get access to the grantaccess methods in C#?  Thanks!
C#

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kaufmed

8/22/2022 - Mon
ASKER CERTIFIED SOLUTION
BuggyCoder

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kaufmed

To Access these methods, you need to derive from SPDatabase class and then from your derived class you will be able to access these methods.
Incorrect. The methods are marked internal, which means only other types from the same assembly can gain access to that method. You might be able to use Reflection, but the methods were marked internal for a reason (meaning someone didn't want outside code using them), so it may not be worthwhile fiddling with these methods.

What is your goal?
kaufmed

P.S.

I agree with the explanation of protected. It's the internal that's giving you the grief  = )
BuggyCoder

Hi @kaufmed,

i though i made a mess here!!!
Just Rechecking and found that Methods are marked as protected internal....

so they can be used by derived type as well as the types in the same assembly.

Keep Well...
Happy Coding -:)
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rwheeler23
kaufmed

The mistake is mine--due to my misunderstanding of what protected internal entails. I took them as a combined meaning--can only be used within the same assembly, and only if derived--whereas it seems their meaning is separate--can be used within the same assembly or derived in an external assembly. I learned something new. Yay  = )