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Deploying MSI via group policies

I want to deploy a software package [MSI], via group policy.

Right now it is:  assigned / Computers in a test OU.

When I apply this does the test computer have to be rebooted for the GPO to take affect?

Windows Server 2008 R2.

Thanks
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techgenious
Asked:
techgenious
1 Solution
 
IT-ShrekCommented:
no, just wait some time or force manual refresh with gpupdate /force in a cmd window.
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chakkoCommented:
You can do a gpupdate /force and then it should install during the boot/Windows startup process (before the logon screen appears).
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Donald StewartNetwork AdministratorCommented:
GPO software installs *Only* take place during the startup process.

So yes you will need to reboot
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techgeniousAuthor Commented:
can I do a automatic install without rebooting using a batch file:

msiexec.exe \\xyz.com\gpo$\Inventory\TEST.msi /qn /norestart

Put it in the GPO, and this will push out automatically to all the servers I have in an OU, without user intervention and server reboots?
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Donald StewartNetwork AdministratorCommented:
Would you be using the .bat as a logon script ?

Do users have admin rights ?
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techgeniousAuthor Commented:
Do I need more than this?
Yes Administrative rights, etc.

msiexec.exe \\xyz.com\gpo$\Inventory\TEST.msi /qn /norestart
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BigRedRPBCommented:
To do it via a batch file and without rebooting (as long as your users have admin rights), you can use Group Policy Preferences to create a scheduled task.

1. Create the task in GPP (of course, set the start time of the task a bit in the future)
2. Either do a GPUpdate on the machine or wait until policy refreshes, which is 60-90 minutes by default, I think.
3. The task should fire off the install.  You can also set the task to run only once and to delete if it does not need to run again.

See here for more details:  http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc770904.aspx

Keep in mind, the cleanest way to do this is by assigning the software via standard Group Policy Software and restarting.  That makes it easier to remove in the future as you can simply remove the assignment and have Group Policy uninstall the software.  You 'could' actually do both the assignment and the scheduled task to have the best of both worlds.  That 'should' work, but you may want to test before rolling it out to 1000 users.  :)
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techgeniousAuthor Commented:
It has to be done via PowerShell Script, so I was able to do the MSIE command which I have to embed into PS.

msiexec /i "\\xyz.com\gpo$\TestInventory\Test Inventory.msi" /quiet /norestart
That worked when I tried it @ the command line.

Now I have to put that into a PowerShell script which I have as:

$script = {
   
$args = "/i "\\xyz.com\gpo$\TestInventory\Test Inventory.msi"  /quiet /norestart
[diagnostics.process]::start("msiexec.exe", $args).WaitForExit()
   
}

I am going to try this script and see if it works from Power Shell ISE
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