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Windows XP Profile Moved to Remote Desktop Server

Posted on 2012-03-20
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I am moving a user from a Windows XP computer to a thin client where he will be using a Remote Desktop Session for his computer. When moving from a Windows XP computer to a Windows 7 computer, I know you can use Windows Easy Transfer which copies all files, settings, shortcuts, favorites, etc. What's the best way to transfer a Windows XP profile from a computer to a Remote Desktop Server so that the user can retain their files and settings despite the different computing environment?
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Question by:brownmetals
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Darius Ghassem earned 500 total points
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Here is what someone else did. You would still use the Windows Easy Transfer.

http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/en-US/windowsserver2008r2rds/thread/b7c338b8-16f0-445f-b5b5-2dca9b40561d/

Here is the final procedure that we used to move user profiles from two 2003 Terminal Servers to different 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Connection Servers:
We looked into Immidio and the client looked at pricing etc. in which he decided that the best alternative for him was to use a manual method that fit in with his schedule better, as well as the schedule of his IT staff. Here is the method that was used to successfully migrate user profiles from Windows Server 2003 Terminal Server to Windows Server 2008 R2 Remote Desktop Connection Server:
1.      Copy a user profile(s) that you want to migrate from the 2003 Terminal Server to a Windows XP Professional machine. Save it (them) in the Documents and Settings directory.
2.      Logon to the Windows XP Professional machine as one of the users whose profile was moved. Check in the Documents and Settings directory to make sure that you have not created a new profile for the user. If the profile that you copied was named the username, and you see that there is a username.domainanme in the Documents and Settings directory, then there has been a new profile created. If this is the case then rename the username. DOMAINNAME to username.old, and rename the username profile to username.DOMAINNAME, using all caps.
3.      Log back on as the user and make sure that it is the “old” 2003 Terminal Server profile. If it is, and it should be, then log off of the Windows XP Professional machine. The profile is ready to transfer. (Do this for all user profiles that you want to transfer).
4.      Using a Windows 7 machine and a USB drive, start the Windows Easy Transfer wizard and go through the steps. Once the required steps are completed, remove the USB drive and place it into a USB port on the Windows XP Professional machine.
5.      Start the Windows Easy Transfer wizard on the XP Professional machine; it will go through all of the profiles that you have copied from your 2003 Terminal Server. Choose the profiles that you want to copy. These will be saved on the USB flash drive.
6.      Place the flash drive into a USB port on the Windows 7 machine and complete the Windows Easy Transfer wizard. All of the profiles that you chose will now be converted to Windows 7 and Windows Server 2008 R2 format.
7.      Copy the converted files from the Users folder on the Windows 7 machine using a mapped drive to the Users folder on the RDC Server.
8.      Apply the appropriate permissions to the profile for that user; which is usually Full Control.
9.      Test each user account and make sure that a new profile is not recreated. If so follow the same procedure outlined in Step 2.
We got this procedure down to around 15 minutes per user profile (minus the copying time of the profile from the 2003 Terminal Server to the XP Pro machine). Each user that was moved has reported no issues. This customer was also using Microsoft Outlook 2003 and POP3 service, in which there were around 50% errors; but a simple re-mapping to the .pst files resolved the issue. You will also notice that there is a great deal of some type of file-level compression as well as the removal of unneeded files during the conversion process; this is ideal for moving and working with the converted profiles.
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