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Hosting a website from a dynamic IP

Posted on 2012-03-20
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Last Modified: 2013-11-19
I recently upgraded my internet to the point that it is much faster and more reliable than my current webhost. I would like to move my current domain to be hosted at home, but my IP address is dynamic. As far as I know, I only get a new IP when I restart my modem and or router (which is almost never) or when cable one (my ISP) pushes out a firmware update (rarely).

There are a few ways I can see doing this
1) convince my ISP to give me a static IP
2) assign my router my current IP to force a static IP (which might work?)
3) set my dns record to my current IP address and update it on the rare occasions that it changes.

Obviously I'm hoping that the first one works, but I don't want to pay a lot of extra money (if that's what it takes) to get a static IP address.

Has anyone had any luck with something like that?
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Question by:HDM
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gnemi earned 250 total points
ID: 37745802
ISP's typically charge quite a bit per month for a static IP but that is the first thing I would check on. Comcast is $15 per month.

If that's not cheap then I would look for a registrar with dynamic dns support. Dyn.com charges $30 per year for use of their dns services. Enom includes dynamic dns support if you have your domain registered with them. Alternatively, you could just set your dns to your current IP address with a low TTL and just update it whenever the IP address changes.
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Assisted Solution

by:n4th4nr1ch
n4th4nr1ch earned 250 total points
ID: 37745830
no-ip.org
^sign up for free

then, add a host (free)

then, download and run no-ip DUC program on your web server, tell it to run on bootup or run as service. make sure it's updating the host you added.

your dns records will be slightly weird since you can't point your main domain to a host name, but you can for subdomains, such as www.

so in this case www.example.com would be a CNAME to yourhost.no-ip.org

if you control your own DNS it may also be possible to script the updating of your primary domain name to IP mapping. This would be especially easy on linux or UNIX.
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Expert Comment

by:Dave Baldwin
ID: 37745874
For what it's worth, you would be better off getting a new web host.  Your viewers/users will be seeing your web site at your Upload speed, not your Download speed.
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Expert Comment

by:Lee W, MVP
ID: 37745981
If you're running a web site "for the fun of it" then go for it.  If you're running a web site for your business, then you should realize, to provide the same level of service and redundancy, you will also need to get AT LEAST a second ISP, a good dual WAN router, and both a UPS for short power outages and a Generator for long ones.  Assuming you don't want to spend the thousands this will cost up-front and hundreds, most likely, per month to maintain, I would strongly recommend simply switching web hosts because the one you have may not be good, but some, like he.net (the one I use) have great infrastructures at very good prices

Keep in mind, if you host yourself, your ISP may block access to standard web port 80 since most consumer ISPs don't want people running their own web servers on their network.  The exceptions are business accounts, which depending on the ISP, could cost you 2-3x as much (Time Warner Cable is AWFUL, FiOS and Verizon, not TOO bad on this front).  Of course, some may not give a residential address a business class account (never had them deny me, but I only work with Cablevision on a regular basis and going to commercial addresses).
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Expert Comment

by:Dave Baldwin
ID: 37746047
Cool, my own web site is also on he.net (Hurricane Electric, always liked that name) along with 5 of my clients.
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