Is there an easy way to determine manually entered DNS addresses

Over the years we have had different IT persons create manual DNS entries for servers, applications, etc. A lot of these entries are for old server names that no longer exist in active directory or our environment as a whole.

Short of opening up the DNS console and going line by line is there an easy way to determine the manually created DNS entries so that I can find and remove the ones that are no longer needed.
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Joseph DalyAsked:
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Mike KlineCommented:
I'll have to test your question, won't blow smoke...not sure, but if you haven't cleaned up DNS in a long time have you thought about enabling scavenging on your DNS server and zones?

http://blogs.technet.com/b/networking/archive/2008/03/19/don-t-be-afraid-of-dns-scavenging-just-be-patient.aspx

That is a good first step for cleanup.

Thanks

Mike
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JohnBusiness Consultant (Owner)Commented:
No way I know of, since the entries were created over time. You need to review the entries and remove the ones that are not needed. I always make a list first in case I need to go backward. ... Thinkpads_User
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netjgrnautCommented:
Thinkpads_user is correct.  Scavenging will (should?) only impact dynamic records, though if static records are created w/a TTL value - it can have unexpected results.  The scavenging process certainly doesn't have any "do what I mean, not what I say" logic in it - e.g. it doesn't know the difference between an old-but-frequently-used entry and the type of cruft you're trying to clean up.

Perhaps more to the point: what is driving this DNS cleanup?  Are forward or reverse responses coming out with conflicting/invalid data?  It's not like there's any great benefit to deleting things you *think* you don't need from DNS per se.

On the other hand, if you've really got a good grasp on what a *clean* zone should look like, I'd recommend provisioning a new *temp* DNS server as the primary with the *clean* zone file.  Then configure your current primary DNS server as a secondary, pointing to the new primary.  This will push the clean zone to the *real* primary.  Finally, reconfigure the *real* primary as... primary - and deprovision the temp DNS server.  All your current secondaries will pull the new *clean* zone data from the *real* primary, once it is again authoritative for the zone.

Hope that helps...
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Tony MassaCommented:
Ease is a relative term, so here's some info.  AD-Integrated DNS zones stores each record in AD, so you can certainly query them with any LDAP-compliant tool, like ADFind.

Here is the ADfind command to find the owner of all DNS records or just one.  If a DNS record is owned by a user (or unresolvable), then it is most likely a static DNS record.

adfind -default -owneronly -resolveSIDs -f objectClass=dnsNode
adfind -default -owneronly -resolveSIDs -f "(&(objectClass=dnsNode)(name=DNS-RECORD-NAME))"

Open in new window


Here, someone is using powershell cmdlets to find DNS security information that may be helpful:
http://social.technet.microsoft.com/Forums/hu/winserverpowershell/thread/04c74ee1-6b5d-484a-a32e-1d974ffe933d

Note: You will want to export the adfind output (for multiple records) to a CSV file.
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Leon FesterSenior Solutions ArchitectCommented:
Manually created DNS entries would be static records, as such they won't have timestamp.
Enabling scavening won't cleanup records that don't have a timestamp.

You can export the DNS server zone file from the DNS console.

Open DNS console
Navigate to your forward lookup zones,
Right click the DNS Zone name and click Export.
Save the file as .csv

Open file in excel and sort the .csv file by date and you'll have a list of all static entries.

You can then use Excel's =concatenate function to complete the appropriate DNSCMD command.

dnscmd ServerName /recorddelete ZoneName NodeName RRType RRData
e.g. dnscmd myDC1 /recordelete myDNS.ZoneName myServerName A 10.0.0.1

More info on DNSCMD command
http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/cc756116(v=ws.10).aspx

It's very useful when you've got to manually prune your DNS Database.

P.S. Always backup your DNS zone before deleting records.
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Joseph DalyAuthor Commented:
Thanks
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