Determine xlfileformat of Excel workbook using VBA

I am writing an application (in Access 2010) that works with Excel workbooks. These workbooks may be from any version of Excel (i.e. Excel 200. 2003, 2007, etc.). In order to work with these files I need to know the appropriate xlfileformat value to use.
I am looking for a function/procedure that will examine the file and return its xlfileformat.
I've seen suggestions of looking at the extension and using a series of Select/Case statements, but this would seem to be an incomplete solution at best. I would like to be using a function that I don't have to update with a new Case statement every time a new release of Office comes out. Is the xlfileformat value or something that readily translates to it stored as an attribute of the Excel file? In the metadata perhaps?
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shambaladAsked:
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byundtCommented:
Excel has a FileFormat properties for workbooks

Set wb = xlApp.ActiveWorkbook      'Assumes that xlApp has been instantiated as Excel.Application
MsgBox wb.FileFormat

This property will return an integer value. There are many possibilities, the most important being:
xlExcel8 56 Excel8    .xls
xlOpenXMLTemplate 54 Open XML Template .xltx
xlOpenXMLTemplateMacroEnabled 53 Open XML Template Macro Enabled .xltm
xlOpenXMLWorkbook 51 Open XML Workbook  .xlsx
xlOpenXMLWorkbookMacroEnabled 52 Open XML Workbook Macro Enabled .xlsm
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byundtCommented:
If you don't want to open the file first, you can get its file type (as text) from the FileSystemObject:
Function FileType(filePathAndName As String) As Integer
Dim fs, f, s
Set fs = CreateObject("Scripting.FileSystemObject")
Set f = fs.GetFile(filePathAndName)
s = UCase(f.Name) & " is a " & f.Type
MsgBox s
End Function

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shambaladAuthor Commented:
Thank you,
Todd
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