Adding a second domain to Exchange 2003 so clients in Outlook 2010 will have separate Calendars, and Contacts

We are using Exchange Server 2003, along with Outlook 2010 client. We would like to know the best way to add a 2nd domain so that users can have two email accounts along with separate Calendars, and Contacts.

Easily we can add domains (see attached Adding a 2nd Domain to Exchange Server 2003), going through the Exchange System Manager > Default Policy Properties > and adding the second domain for all users. This would likely be the configuration recommended on previous versions of Outlook. Users can at least send/receive emails, albeit the separation of Calendars, and Contacts would become impossible.

Again, with Outlook 2010 client we do have the opportunity of using more than one Exchange email account. The problem is in knowing exactly how to approach this. Would it be possible to create a separate message store for the 2nd domain… or is this not recommended?

We are open to any suggestion that keep us from purchasing more hardware/software. Thanks very much.
techno-nothingAsked:
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Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
You would need to create a secon AD account to have this second mailbox attached to and then you can add that second mailbox to the original users outlook session.
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techno-nothingAuthor Commented:
Thanks Neil... so a second AD needs to be a part of the equation too. That makes sense. Have you seen anything like this in production? Is any of this questionable/risky?
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Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
No not a second AD, just a second account on your current AD.

So if you have John.Doe current in your domain recieving emails at john.doe@mydomain.com you need to create a NEW AD account called, for example, john.doe2
Now change the mail properties of that user to have a PRIMARY SMTP Address of john.doe@SecondDomain.com

Now log in to a workstation as john.doe and launch outlook, add the john.doe2 as a second exchange account. Job done.
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techno-nothingAuthor Commented:
Thank Neil, I think i understand, but can you provide the steps towards creating a "New AD account"? Maybe a link? Thanks.
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techno-nothingAuthor Commented:
I actually had to setup a test domain and go through the MX changes on the outside DNS server. Then I followed my intuition regarding were to go in the Exchange System Manager > Recipient Policies > [creating New policy] > etc.

This is all being done on a production server so I got lucky IT WORKED! I still have some experimenting to before we are in production with the real 2nd company domain.

I really want to say THANK YOU to Neilsr for pointing me in the right direction. IMHO I would have assumed the user had little experience and spelled it out with greater details. In the technical world MORE is [at least for me] better.
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