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Install second Exchange 2010 on the network to perform migration

We are taking over a network that has Exchange 2010 that we don't trust (it may have problems) and need to install another Exchange 2010 to perform migration and then retire the old one. Is there a guide I could follow to make sure I do it right? Any other suggestions I should follow?

Thank you
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piotrmikula108
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piotrmikula108
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Glen KnightCommented:
Step 1. Install second Exchange Server with all roles (CAS, HT, Mailbox)
Step 2. Set the RPCClientAccess Attribute for the existing databases to the new server.  See here for further details: http://technet.microsoft.com/en-us/library/bb123971.aspx
Step 3. Update rules for OWA, ActiveSync and SMTP on firewall to come to new server instead of old one
Step 4. move all mailboxes.  Including Arbitration and Arxive mailbox.  Use the command Get-Mailbox -database database-name -arbitration and the same command with -archive to view them
Step 5. If using, move public folder replicas to new server
Step 6. Uninstall Exchange from old server
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Glen KnightCommented:
Oops! Step 1.5 Install SSL Certificate on new server which has correct names relative to the new server.
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piotrmikula108Author Commented:
Thx

Do I need any transport rules between the two servers while they coexist?
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tigermattCommented:
Nope! As long as you don't mess around with the default receive connectors on either server then the boxes will transfer email between each other accordingly. (You need to ensure Exchange Server permissions and authentication are enabled at the very minimum, otherwise the boxes can't authenticate with each other and mail will back up in the queues).

-Matt
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Glen KnightCommented:
No, as Matt said, you don't need Send Connectors between the servers.

However, a common problem is that the Receive Connector called DEFAULT SERVERNAME has had the FQDN changed.  This needs to be the internal fully qualified domain name of the server it's hosted on.

Also, on the new server the anonymous user permission needs to be enabled otherwise you won't be able to receive any email.
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