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vmware datastore capacity

Posted on 2012-03-22
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Last Modified: 2012-04-11
I have a datastore and more than half of the virtual machines on this datastores are thin provisoned, and some of them grow sometimes dynamically with 50 or 100 GB. I want to ensure that the datastore are not overprovisioned( GB given to all machine, not used at the moment) so in case of any incident  grow to have any issue with no free space, and my storage does not support extension of the LUNs so I will have a problem. How to ensure this?
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Question by:dedri
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by:roemelboemel
ID: 37751408
Why don't you use thick provisioning then?
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ID: 37751954
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by:coolsport00
ID: 37752080
You can convert your VMs to 'thick' disk so you know exactly the capacity your datastore is using explicitly, as @hanccocka mentions. But instead of going through the long, drawn-out process of a V2V and converting your disks, just do it manually. See pg. 131 of the VM Admin Guide:
http://pubs.vmware.com/vsphere-50/topic/com.vmware.ICbase/PDF/vsphere-esxi-vcenter-server-501-virtual-machine-admin-guide.pdf

Basically, just go into the datastore of the VMs (rt-click on datastore -> Browse Datastore). Go into each VM folder of each VM that has a thin-disk, rt-click on the .vmdk file, and select 'Inflat'. This will 'convert' the disk from thin to thick.

Regards,
~coolsport00
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by:dedri
ID: 37752145
I don't want to use Thick virtual machine disks, but thin provisioned and I am looking for any way to find if my datastore is overprovisioned.
I don't trust to Datastore views Summary tab Capacity box, so I am looking for any other way to calculate it. Maybe some script which  calculate  it by Capacity minus FreeSpace plus Uncommitted. Or anything else that you can propose me.
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ID: 37752168
I would recommend using the following, also VMware recommends the use of PowerCLI, which is PowerShell interface with vSphere-specific additions.

http://communities.vmware.com/community/vmtn/server/vsphere/automationtools/powercli

One of the simplest PowerCLI examples, and something which is actually extremely useful on its own, is the Get-VM cmdlet. Which lists VMs.

PowerCLI can be a bit overwhelming to use,  But it can be enhanced with a nice toolset and a library of preconfigured scripts to jump-start your mass changes, which is possible with PowerGUI

http://powergui.org/index.jspa

and

VMware Community Pack

http://www.virtu-al.net/featured-scripts/vmware-powerpack/
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ID: 37752170
Veeam Monitor for free


If you want a quick tool, to help you with wanting to know all the individual elements, then I would suggest using Veeam Monitor Free Edition

Veeam Monitor leverages Veeam Business View™ to enable performance monitoring, alerting and reporting for virtual machine groups based on criteria such as business unit, department, location, purpose, service-level agreement or any other criteria you define. This ability to perform business-centric monitoring helps to identify the business impact of a virtual infrastructure’s performance and respond accordingly. It also allows you to configure flexible alerts based on known server type characteristics and the potential business impact of an outage for more granular service-level management. You can also create targeted reports showing only the data relevant to specific business units, departments or types of server.
More features

Source
http://www.veeam.com/esxi-monitoring-free.html.
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coolsport00 earned 500 total points
ID: 37752227
Not sure how monitoring tools would work for you exactly, because 1. thin disk will only show what you're using, but that's not the only space user. You have 2. .vswp file space taking up DS space and, 3. memory overhead (albeit fairly miniscule...around 200-500MB per VM depending on VM mem allocation as well as VM vCPU allocation) taking up space; oh, and 4. potential snapshots of VMs taking up space. Without disks showing as 'thick', I'm not sure you can get any kind of monitoring tool to show "provisioned" as opposed what is actually being used.

~coolsport00
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