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Setting up webserver to work with DMZ and Internal network

Posted on 2012-03-22
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Last Modified: 2012-03-23
Hello, we have a Windows Server 2003 R2 server already setup as a webserver in a DMZ which is working fine.  However we recently installed an anti-virus client on it which needs to be able to "phone home" to a Management Server on the internal network.  We have opened ports specified by the vendor which would supposedly allow it to see the Management Server from within the DMZ, but it still cannot.  The web server has a 2nd NIC on it which we use to connect it to the internal network when needed, but we cannot leave it connected all the time, as this will "confuse" the incoming traffic trying to get to the webserver on the DMZ side.  We were wondering how we can setup the second NIC to allow the server to "phone home" to the internal server while preventing confusion of the web traffic coming in from the DMZ.  Thanks for your help.  Mike
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Question by:miket71
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Keith Alabaster earned 500 total points
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You don't - you REALLY don't want to do this. You fix the issue that is currently precluding the DMZ server from talking over the internal firewall to the internal server instead.

If you connect another nic directly to the internal network then anyone who gains access to the dmz box has access to your internal network. If the DMZ box DOES get infected, which will be quicker, the main server manages to disenfect the DMZ box or the trojan/virus/whatever activates and is onto your network? Not a risk I would put my name to or expose my organisation to.

Most of the main players in the AV field (Sophos for example) now have two ways to deploy their updates. The first being through an internal server - much as you have by the sound of it. The second being through an on-line portal - and it is this second route that you point devices such as the DMZ servers. Your internal server console should still be able to 'manage' the DMZ box to check status etc but it all goes via the firewall - not a direct connection that bypasses your security perimeter.

Keith
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by:miket71
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Hi Keith,

We ended up opening the appropriate ports in the firewall to allow the webserver to communicate with the management server from the DMZ connection.  Thanks for your prompt response.

Mike
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by:Keith Alabaster
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More than welcome. :)
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