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I Unix bash shell script how to check for "ERROR" within a .LOG file?

Posted on 2012-03-22
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Last Modified: 2012-03-23
In the Unix bash shell script, what would be an example of searching within Unix directory for a file ("sasprog1.LOG") and then checking for an ERROR within "sasprog1.LOG" file and then opening another file ("file1.txt") and then writing some messages to "file1.txt" file?

Please note: "file1.txt" may or may not exist in the Unix directory. "sasprog1.LOG" does exist in the Unix directory.

Any examples or comments on this will be very appreciated!!
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Question by:labradorchik
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6 Comments
 
LVL 68

Expert Comment

by:woolmilkporc
ID: 37753332
if grep -q "ERROR" sasprog1.LOG ;
   then echo "Error found in sasprog1.LOG" > file1.txt
fi
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Author Comment

by:labradorchik
ID: 37753354
Can this be done in any other way?
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LVL 68

Expert Comment

by:woolmilkporc
ID: 37753388
find /start/dir -type f -name "sasprog1.LOG" |while read file
  do
    RESULT=$(grep "ERROR" $file)
      if [[ ! -z $RESULT ]]
         then
            echo "Error(s) in $file: $RESULT" >> file1.txt
     fi
  done
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Author Comment

by:labradorchik
ID: 37753848
woolmilkporc, thank you for your example!
Question:
Would it work with referencing specific directories like in this example?  

mydir=/start/dir

find $mydir -type f -name "sasprog1.LOG" |while read file
  do
    RESULT=$(grep "ERROR" $file)
      if [[ ! -z $RESULT ]]
         then
            echo "Error(s) in $file: $RESULT" >> file1.txt
     fi
  done

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LVL 68

Accepted Solution

by:
woolmilkporc earned 500 total points
ID: 37753902
Yes, of course.

You can also have the filenames as variables, as well as the search string.
mydir="/start/dir"
filename="sasprog1.LOG"
search="ERROR"
outfile="file1.txt"

find "$mydir" -type f -name "$filename" |while read file
  do
    RESULT=$(grep "$search" "$file")
      if [[ ! -z $RESULT ]]
         then
            echo "Error(s) in $file: $RESULT" >> "$outfile"
     fi
  done

Open in new window



Please don't be astonished about the many quotation marks - you only have to use them if you suspect embedded spaces or special characters being present in the respective strings.
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Author Comment

by:labradorchik
ID: 37753968
This is great!!  Exactly what I was looking for! Thank you!!
Could you please also check out another question that I have at:  http://www.experts-exchange.com/OS/Unix/Q_27644555.html
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