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installing software using Group policy

Posted on 2012-03-23
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Last Modified: 2012-04-09
I have a situation where I need to install an msi package using group policy which works fine, but then right after that, I need to apply an update to the same package with a second msi package.  I am not sure how to prioritize the order of applications to be applied via group policy, can anyone explain how to do that?  Also, is there an option to force a restart after the last package?
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Question by:evel1959
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by:colonytire
colonytire earned 500 total points
ID: 37758095
You can prioritize the scripts in GP.  I often times build a batch script that runs them in the order needed.  If you do the batch script you could tell the script to restart the machine using shutdown /r after it runs the msi installers.
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by:evel1959
ID: 37758104
OK thanks, I will play with that.   Are you simply running  a windows batch file or are you using some other scripting language?
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by:colonytire
ID: 37758147
just a simple DOS type windows .bat file
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colonytire earned 500 total points
ID: 37758232
@echo off
TITLE Name_your_Script


ECHO.
ECHO Installing YOUR_APP_NAME
ECHO Please wait...
start /wait "Folder_location\firstpackage.msi" /qn <Quiet with no interaction


ECHO.
ECHO Installing YOUR_Update_NAME
ECHO Please wait...
start /wait "Folder_location\secondpackage.msi" /qn


shutdown.exe -r -f -t 10 -c "Windows will now restart in 10 seconds..."
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by:evel1959
ID: 37758291
This looks nice.  In a bit, I will try it and let you know how it works for me.  I have some transform work to do ahead of this before I can try.  Thanks so much.
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by:evel1959
ID: 37766410
So I created a batch file that does this and I beleive it will work, however, when trying to launch it from Group policy, the only type of file it will allow me to point to is an msi.  I am a newbie to Group policy and not sure how to accomplish executing a batch file from Group policy.  Did I miss something?  Does it need to be converted or wrapped in an msi?
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by:colonytire
colonytire earned 500 total points
ID: 37766504
Put the .bat or .cmd that you created in the apropriate sysvol folder of the DC server. Then when you click the add button in the GPeditor it will be available to you.

You can easily copy across the network using \\DCserverName\SYSVOL\domainname.???\scripts\

Hope this helps,
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