splitting a delimited list into an "array" with T-SQL

I can find umpteen articles on the web about getting around the "array problem" in T-SQL.  But I'm looking for a solution that's the easiest.

Picture a SQL table containing delimited text strings laid out basically like so:

Option 1=10;Something Else=20;Other=99

I want to parse this, first by semicolon delimiters, then by the = sign into key-value pairs.

What's the easiest way to do this that YOU use?

Thanks for the help.
bamapieAsked:
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aikimarkCommented:
* Do the parsing in two passes

* This is an excellent article on parsing, in case you haven't already read it
http:/A_1536-delimited-list-as-parameter-what-are-the-options.html

* Jeff Moden has a wonderful article and long discussion on the fastest parsing method over at SQL Server Central (do a search for "Tally OH"

* how often do you need to do this parsing?

* how critical is performance?
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ValentinoVBI ConsultantCommented:
Another option which aikimark didn't mention yet, and I might see myself using (depending on the situation) is Integration Services.

Given a string like that and seeing that you'd like to split it up in Key/Value pairs, this seems to be part of a data load process somehow.  So I'd probably create an SSIS package to handle that.  In the package I would use a Script Component in the Data Flow to do the parsing in C#.  VB.NET would of course also be an option.  .NET has got excellent string manipulation functions.

But again, it all depends on your situation.  So there you are, one more option :)

If you need further info on this method, just ask!
Valentino.
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Steve BinkCommented:
The *easiest* method I know of is to normalize the data.  No parsing necessary when you can use SELECT..FROM to get a cursor of name/value rows.
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aikimarkCommented:
Microsoft offers this tutorial article on parsing using the power of the .Net language.  In the Tally OH article thread, the conclusion was that, although T-SQL could perform parsing very fast, its performance couldn't touch that of .Net (plug-in) parsing.
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/magazine/cc163473.aspx
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aikimarkCommented:
Since your data pattern is simple, you might also approach the solution through an transformation from string to XML.  Once in XML format, your T-SQL can use XPath to get the name/value pairs' data.

Example, using your data sample:
'<NVdata><ItemName>' + Replace(Replace(myfield, ';', '</ItemValue><ItemName>'), '=', '</ItemName><ItemValue>') + '</ItemValue></NVdata>'


Result (formatted for readability.
<NVdata>
<ItemName>Option 1</ItemName><ItemValue>10</ItemValue>
<ItemName>Something Else</ItemName><ItemValue>20</ItemValue>
<ItemName>Other</ItemName><ItemValue>99</ItemValue>
</NVdata>

Open in new window


Replace reference:
http://msdn.microsoft.com/en-us/library/ms186862.aspx

===================
If that seems a bit verbose, you can shorten the XML tags and achieve something like this:
'<NV><N>' + Replace(Replace(myfield, ';', '</V><N>'), '=', '</N><V>') + '</V></NV>'

Formatted view:
<NV>
<N>Option 1</N><V>10</V>
<N>Something Else</N><V>20</V>
<N>Other</N><V>99</V>
</NV>

Open in new window

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bamapieAuthor Commented:
Thanks!  

By the way, this kind of parsing is a rare activity.  The results I do write into a table from which they're actually used.
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