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Linux, dstat (users, system, siq)

Posted on 2012-03-23
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Last Modified: 2012-06-21
In RHEL 6.2, on dstat I get the following

----total-cpu-usage---- -net/total- sda-
usr sys idl wai hiq siq| recv  send|util

 33  22  24   0   0  21| 462M  478M|   0

What is siq

Since utilization is 76 (100 - idle), and user + system + siq = 76, what eexactly is siq ?

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Question by:Los Angeles1
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legolasthehansy earned 500 total points
ID: 37758376
HIQ and SIQ shows the interrupts for both software and hardware
HIQ - Hardware IRQ servicing time
SIQ - Software IRQ servicing time

The high value for SIQ shows an interrupt has been caused by the software. You will need to check what program is doing this and check it.
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