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Adding new hard drive into Server 2003 & moving files

Hi All

Quick sanity check please.

I'm popping out to put a new secondary hard drive in a Windows 2003 Server (Dell Optiplex GX400) tomorrow as the OEM fitment is only 18GB and creaking at the seams!

I'm quite happy installing drives, been supporting desktops for years but I don't fiddle much with servers so a quick question to double check I'm not going to make a rod for my own back.

Once I've popped the new drive in, is it a simple matter of moving the folder hierarchy (I'm talking data folders here, not OS obviously) over to the new drive? i.e, will all the share permissions move with the folders or will I have to set up the user access permissions again for those folders?

Thanks.
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sefton-computer-repairs
Asked:
sefton-computer-repairs
1 Solution
 
Neil RussellTechnical Development LeadCommented:
If your primary HD in the server is only 18GB then i would consider taking it offline, using ghost or acronis to make an image of it and puttint the image on the new large drive
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Martin81Commented:
When you move a folder to a different drive it wont keep permissions, it will inherit permissions from the drive you move it to so you'd need to re-create the permissions, and re-create the the share.

If the permissions are complex have a look at robocopy which has options to retain permissions.
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Lee W, MVPTechnology and Business Process AdvisorCommented:
What do you mean by "secondary"?  Is this a RAID? A mirror?  or a data drive with no RAID?  If the latter, I really hope you're planning on getting TWO drives - no system considered a server in a production environment should be without a RAID 1 at least.

What you do depends on the server usage.  If this is a secondary (as in mirrored) drive, then you'll probably have to rebuild the mirror, but shares and permissions shouldn't be affected.

If this is a primary drive, as in NO REDUNDANCY and you are replacing it, then one option might be to install the drive, CREATE a software mirror, then break the mirror by removing the old, failing drive.  Another option would be to stop the server service, copy ALL the data using a tool like Robocopy or XCOPY to preserve the permissions and once the copy is finished, re-letter the drives so the new one matches the old - then you can start the server service and the shares and any defined share permissions should be fine.

REGARDLESS, you're making a MAJOR change - PERFORM A FULL BACKUP!!!
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sefton-computer-repairsAuthor Commented:
Thanks for the info Martin, I hadn't clicked about it inheriting permissions from the new drive. Just needed to add some time to my schedule to recreate those.

Thanks for the other comments too guys. I agree about RAID etc but it's a case of small steps for these guys. Putting the extra drive & a GB of RAM in has transformed performance. They've only just got the idea of storing data on the server - it was sat there doing nothing except password authentication.

There's backup now in place and when they're ready to move up to something newer then I'll be recommending RAID of course.
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