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Some 208V units not powered

Posted on 2012-03-24
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
We have an APC 7500 RT XL UPS, which is 208V, and a Tripp Lite PDUNV attached to it via L6-20P cable.  We then have a Cisco 4500 that is plugged into the PDUNV using the C19 ports on the PDUNV.  We have a second PDUNV for redundancy.  The 4500 powers on and works properly.  It is rated 100-240 VAC.  

So here is the problem.  The PDUNV has several C13 outlets.  I have a Cisco 2960 switch, ASA 5520, and 5508 wireless controller that all have power supplies that are rated 100-240 VAC.  I tried taking a C13 to C14 power cable and plugging the C13 into one of the PDUNV C13s and then the C14 into the device.  None of the devices show any sign of power.

Am I missing something here.  Is this not possible?

Thanks
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Question by:Mugatu44
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by:wolfcamel
ID: 37762025
check the circuit breaker on the PDU -
the voltage 100-240 VAC shouldnt matter too much - the main concern is the AMPS.
The total current drained is what determines if something will trip or cant maintain supply.
Although I would have thought you would be well under the ratings for these devices.

Try plugging something direct into the UPS to see if it is outputting. Try just one thing.

Also there isnt much point having a second PDUNV for redunancy - as they are pretty dumb devices - basically just a fancy powerboard. Try having another UPS for redundancy!

Also - a lot of UPS have a power switch that needs to be turned on to turn on the output power - even they they may appear "powered up" when they have input power.
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by:Mugatu44
ID: 37762031
I have the second PDUNV which I will plug into another 208V UPS that I have on order.  So I know it's not the PDU.  I will have to check but I don't recall any switches on the PDU.  I have a 110 step down until plugged into the UPS as well and it works fine so I know it's not the UPS.  The UPS is at 10% load.
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wolfcamel earned 500 total points
ID: 37762035
it may be time to put a multimeter into the output sockets and see what voltage you are getting - sorry state the obvious - but "something is faulty"
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Expert Comment

by:Darr247
ID: 37762613
This might not be relevant, but 208V is usually a 3-phase voltage, here in the USA.
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Author Closing Comment

by:Mugatu44
ID: 37763882
The multimeter ended up solving the issue here.  After replugging some stuff and using different cables I got the voltage I needed.  Thanks.
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