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When You Do A Distribution Upgrade Of Linux Ubuntu, Can You Lose Any Of The Installed Software Programs That Are Previously Installed With The Last Previous Distribution? Please See Details Below.

Posted on 2012-03-25
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Last Modified: 2012-08-14
Hello. I have a question to ask you regarding Linux Ubuntu.  

If you do a distribution upgrade of Linux Ubuntu v.11.10 64-bit from v.11.04 64-bit, can you ever lose ANY of the installed software that is:

(a) installed by default with (inherent with) the distribution of Linux Ubuntu?
(b) installed from Ubuntu Software Center (USC) whether by manual download files where USC will finish the install or found in the Ubuntu repositories of the USC interface and USC does the install?
(c) installed from Synaptic Package Manager?
(d) installed from Update Manager?
(e) downloaded manually (Ubuntu repositories and third-party repositories) and installed by Archive Manger (File Roller)?
(f) using Terminal with text based methods, like apt-get and Aptitude to install manually downloaded files?
(g) installing *.deb files from manually downloaded files using the programs GDebi and dpkg?
(h) using the web browser like Firefox's later versions of the built in AptURL protocol to install files?    

I believe I have addressed every conceivable method files/programs/packages/software can be installed into Ubuntu to date. I am not positive if the installation methods make a difference with this issue or not? Please explain the different case scenarios where this may be an issue of a loss of installed software program via these means with an upgrade distribution.

If there is a loss of an installed software program, how can or does the user be alerted to know what software programs are removed or deleted during or after the Ubuntu distribution upgrade? Please explain.

Please reply.

Thank you!
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Question by:Bazingeroo
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5 Comments
 
LVL 5

Accepted Solution

by:
cdfs earned 300 total points
ID: 37764549
Normaly you don't loose any packages. In some cases some packages are no longer needed to satisfy dedpendencies, then they can be removed, but you  won't notice as anything will be working as expected. As long as you use the methods above, the internal update-processes should take care of all dependencies and if there are problems found due to not met dependencies, you will be given a warning and can decide yourself what to do. This can occur, when you use other repositories than the official ones.
To add just another possibility how software can be installed on a linux-system, you could also compile yourself from sources a package. This is sometimes done if you needed the latest version that is not available through the repositories or you have to modify the package a little bit, so it meets your needs. This kind of installation is not handled by apt- or dpkg-based methods, where you have a central database anything is documented, so apt or dpkg can't know of any dependencies. Worst thing that can happen in this special situation is, that the software isn't working anymore. What you can do then is just recompile and things should be running again.
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Author Comment

by:Bazingeroo
ID: 37769792
@ cdfs:

Hello. Nice to meet you!

Thank you for a great response!

What a well described comment!!! I have learned a lot. It sounds from your first paragraph that it is very difficult or rare to have any issues with lost installed software.  

Okay, I'll add to my initial post from your comment too as "another possibility how software can be installed on a linux-system":

(i) "compile yourself from sources a package".

I just do not know how you would *install* your added possibility??? You didn't mention it in your comment. Please explain.

Please reply.

Thank you!
0
 
LVL 10

Assisted Solution

by:Tobias
Tobias earned 200 total points
ID: 37770303
Dear Bazingeroo,

Compile yourself from source mean, download the archive of the program to install, extract it then configure it with :
./configure

try to make it with :
make

then if everything is ok you could install it :
make install

More information at :

Installation with make Linux

Regards
0
 

Author Comment

by:Bazingeroo
ID: 37774622
@ MadShiva:

Hello. Thank you for your comments.

I understand now. Thanks for the clarity MadShiva! I follow you. Thanks very much for the weblink or your points would of meant nothing to me.

Again, thank you!
0
 

Author Closing Comment

by:Bazingeroo
ID: 37774637
@ cdfs & MadShiva:

Hello again. I am awarding cdfs the Accepted Solution for cdfs's comment -- not only answered my initial question; but also added one more additional method for my Linux Ubuntu. MadShiva helped by further clarifying my latest questions I had in regards to cdfs's comment rather nicely and well done too with a well explained weblink!    

Both of your expert comments are well done!  

Again, thank you both!
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