mac times ms os

I thought this would be quite easy to identify, but am I correct in thinking that for a file (regardless of file type be that .doc, .txt, .jpeg) on a file share on a windows server, that you cant see who (person) last modified or accessed the file ? I.e. it only goes as far as "the file was accessed dd/mm/yyyy hh:mm", not "the file was accessed dd/mm/yyyy hh:mm by user X"? Is there anyway to identify the user X part? Is the file type irrelevant, or for certain files may the "...by user X" be available?

If its important to see who changed/accessed the file and by default windows cant give you that - what other ways can you do this?
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pma111Asked:
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netjgrnautCommented:
This is from an older version of Windows server, but the process hasn't changed much for subsequent versions...

http://www.techrepublic.com/article/step-by-step-how-to-audit-file-and-folder-access-to-improve-windows-2000-pro-security/5034308
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pma111Author Commented:
So the answer by default (i.e. unless you enable auditing) is "no you cant see who last accessed any file?" ?
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netjgrnautCommented:
...am I correct in thinking that for a file ... that you cant see who (person) last modified or accessed the file ?

Correct.  On MS NTFS file systems, you must enable auditing to track read and/or write file access at the per user level.

...windows cant give you that...

Incorrect.  While auditing is not enabled by default, it is available in any version of the Windows OS that supports NTFS.  The link I posted previously contains information on how to enable file level auditing.

Sorry if I was unclear...

...what other ways can you do this?

I believe the best you can do when you decide you want this type of security *after* the fact, is work on circumstantial evidence.  Who has access rights to the file in question?  What are the access vectors (LAN share v. Internet, for example)?  Which of the file trustees were logged on to the system at the time the file was last accessed/modified based on standard properties?  Certainly nothing that could be qualified as solid forensic data.

Hope that helps.
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