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Shell script as user with root access needed

I need to run a script to change permision to 766 on a file and change another file to a new version of the file. the issue is the script is being called by a java code as a normal user, however the 2 files have root only permission and cant be edited. what I need to do is be able to su -c | chmod 766 /opt/xxx/xxx/file.xml
and mv /etc/my.cnf  /opt/xxx/saved/
mv /opt/my.cnf /etc/

the 3 lines have to be executed as root and we can pass the root password as an incripted value in a variable, how can I create this bash script is my big question. I tried the below but as you can tell just by looking at it it does not work.

#!/bin/bash
PASSWORD="test"

echo $PASSWORD>su root -c chmod 766 /opt/ibm/javapos/jpos.xml

any ideas would be apriciated.
Thanks,
Atorex
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atorex
Asked:
atorex
1 Solution
 
MikeOM_DBACommented:
You need to use "sudo" (ask your sysadmin to set it up):
sudo -c "chmod 766 /opt/ibm/javapos/jpos.xml"

Open in new window

:p
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farzanjCommented:
As MikeOM_DBA said you either need to set up sudo as it appears you have the root password, or second option would be to enable ssh certificates and execute this command through ssh on localhost.  Third way is to use expect.  A regular script would not work because it cannot interact with a terminal (entering password).
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atorexAuthor Commented:
I have the access to change the sudoers file however I need to make this work on 1800 systems and changing the sudoers on all of them is another project. I wqas actualy running my command out of order thats why it didnt work, the below will work and encrypted password from java code

echo $PASSWORD | su -c "chmod 766 /opt/ibm/javapos/jpos.xml" root
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farzanjCommented:
Then the option you have is to use expect.

http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Expect
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simon3270Commented:
Using expect is more portable:


echo Enter root password:
read RPW

expect <<EOF
spawn su - root -c "chmod 766 /opt/ibm/javapos/jpos.xml"
expect "sword"
send "${RPW}\r"
expect EOF
EOF
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atorexAuthor Commented:
echo $PASSWORD | su -c "chmod 766 /opt/ibm/javapos/jpos.xml" root

I'm using a java application to do most of whats needed and adding these to that process utalizing java encription to decrypt the password, I have tested the above and works.

Thanks for the imput.
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