Efficient effective method for managing workstation backups

Im looking for an effective method to managing workstation backups through active directory or other means. I have about 30 workstations on my network. I can setup a backup individually but surely there is a better method. Im interested in hearing what some of you are doing for client backups.

There is no exchange server, they are all pop accounts.
cnl83Asked:
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DatabaseMX (Joe Anderson - Microsoft Access MVP)Database Architect / Systems AnalystCommented:
What exactly are you backing up ?  An Access db?

mx
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cnl83Author Commented:
This was posted in the wrong categories. Sorry
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cnl83Author Commented:
I've requested that this question be deleted for the following reason:

Wrong category posting
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athomsfereCommented:
I think the best solution is to NOT backup the workstations.

Instead, have all important files on a network drive that is backed up. If you want to back up things like favorites, documents and what not. use folder redirection to point to say a users home directory, and then backup the home directory.

One of the biggest things with trying to backup workstations, is that something is going to fail. A laptop goes home or the backup client breaks and no one notices until its too late. With a network backup you must only monitor 1 set of backups for all of the machines.
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athomsfereCommented:
Why not just move this thread where it belongs?
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Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
Going a bit further with athomsfere's post...

What is the need to back up "Workstations"...?
In case there is, in fact, a reason to do this over storing the data on a Network drive (as is typically done)

Where I work, if a user wants to save something on their local machine, (Something Personal) it is up to them to back it up...
Otherwise, all "work" data should be stored on their network share.


JeffCoachman
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cnl83Author Commented:
Yes, but the client doesn't want to do that. Their cabling is old 10/100.
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Jeffrey CoachmanMIS LiasonCommented:
Don't see why 10/100 has anything to do with this...?
...We have 10/100 where I work and there are no issues...

Again, it is rare in a modern networking environment that individual "workstations" are backed up...

<Yes, but the client doesn't want to do that.>
Then it will be up to you as a network admin to decide if this (somewhat non-standard) method of is worth the trouble...

JeffCoachman
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athomsfereCommented:
Going a bit further,

Imagine you are a year into backups before a hard drive fails, and low and behold you realize that that workstation has not been making backups, despite software reporting it is.

How would you monitor this on so many machines, and who is accountable? The client will hold you accountable.

Also by using GPs it automatic. When you switch a PC out or the user moves between spots, there is no additional setup. They log into the machine and it redirects their folders. Then your file server makes the backups.

And 10/100 can certainly handle this, as long as they aren't running giant video files or the like.

I agree with the earlier statement, it is your responsibility to make sure they have the right solution, and not just what they think they need.  I would not stake my company's reputation on a one-off ad-hoc configuration with so many points of failure, when a better, more robust solution with less baby sitting is available.
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Jian An LimSolutions ArchitectCommented:
Okay, i have read the flow, focus on to do backup or not on workstation.
Let's say you sort that one out and we must backup the workstation.

There is a few software that i have used
system recovery desktop edition
http://www.symantec.com/system-recovery-desktop-edition

storage craft
http://www.storagecraft.com.au/shadow_protect_desktop.php

and CA d2d
http://www.arcserve.com/~/media/files/solutionbriefs/ca-arcserve-family-r16-desktop-laptop-solutionbrief.pdf

all of them required storage space to store them so you need some TB to store them.
of course, there are other technology as well, but these are the desktop edition i have used.

Some have better management tools, and some have better smaller disk foot print (but larger disk IO footprint) . Some are set and forget, and some need some management around it.

review them and see which one fit your budget :)
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