Finding Files using shell/perl

Hi,

 can some one please let me know how to find .text files by recursively reading folders and sub folders from a path.

Issue here is , in that folders I have two type of txt files. For example (`7249184.txt',  '7419841_0001.txt'), but I need only to find .txt  

Thanks,
new_perl_userAsked:
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TintinCommented:
Issue here is , in that folders I have two type of txt files. For example (`7249184.txt',  '7419841_0001.txt'), but I need only to find .txt  

That sentence doesn't make sense.  Both your examples are .txt files.

To find .txt files, do

find /some/path -type f -name "*.txt"

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Carl BohmanCommented:
Find all .txt files in the current directory:
perl -MFile::Find -e 'find(sub{/\.txt$/ && print $_,"\n";}, @ARGV)' .

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Modifying the regex allows you to search for any other files by name.  In your case, I think this regex may do what you need:
perl -MFile::Find -e 'find(sub{/^[^_]+\.txt$/ && print $_,"\n";}, @ARGV)' .

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new_perl_userAuthor Commented:
Hi Bounsy,

I tried to run the perl -MFile::Find -e 'find(sub{/^[^_]+\.txt$/ && print $_,"\n";}, @ARGV)'  from command line and it throwed out an error.


invalid top directory at /usr/lib/perl5/5.8.8/File/Find.pm line 592.
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Carl BohmanCommented:
The command included a period at the end.  This was to tell it to search starting from the current directory.  If you want to be more explicit, just list the directories you want to search.
perl -MFile::Find -e 'find(sub{/^[^_]+\.txt$/ && print "$File::Find::name\n";}, @ARGV)' /dir1 /dir2 /sub/dir3

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Also note that I fixed the print statement in the above command, since the original version didn't show the path to the file, just the file name.
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new_perl_userAuthor Commented:
Hi,

Thank you so much it worked. If possible can you please help me to extend the above command.

After finding the file  can we move that file to a location "/usr/HOME/DATA".
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Carl BohmanCommented:
Untested, but something like this should work:
perl -MFile::Find -MFile::Copy -e 'find(sub{/^[^_]+\.txt$/ && move($File::Find::name, "/usr/HOME/DATA");}, @ARGV)' /dir1 /dir2 /sub/dir3

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Note that you need to make sure that the directory /usr/HOME/DATA exists before running this command or you won't get the results you're looking for.
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TintinCommented:
or easier to do

find .  -type f -name "*.txt" | xargs -i mv {} /usr/HOME/DATA

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Carl BohmanCommented:
@Tintin: That does work for the simple case of all .txt files, but not for the case that new_perl_user asked for which is for only some .txt files.  You would need to make the -name option more complicated or add an addiitonal grep command (likely using a regex) in order to only get the files that new_perl_user was interested in.  My solution is obviously more complicated (not necessarily a good thing), but has the advantage of being able to accept any arbitrarily-complex regex for the file name.  In general, I definitely agree that simple is better and prefer simple solutions when they are capable of handling the requirements.
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TintinCommented:
Ah, so you successfully managed to interpret that when new_perl_user said

For example (`7249184.txt',  '7419841_0001.txt'), but I need only to find .txt  

they really meant:

I want to match numeric .txt files only, ie: no underscores.

In that case, a regex is the way to go.

With GNU find, you can do:

find . -type f -regex ".*/[0-9]+.txt"

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ashsysadCommented:
Good one.  I just came to know that we can use RegEx with find command.

Thanks
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