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Difference between windows and ios wireless

On my ipod at work, I had problems staying connected to one of the internal wireless networks, so I put in a fixed ip and it worked great. The other wireless is dhcp on a completely separate network, and it also works great, and gets the proper IP address.  Is there a way to do this with Windows devices, where you can configure the wireless connections independently?  I thought on Windows if you put in a fixed ip for wireless it wouldn't work on any other wireless network because it wouldn't have the right IP.
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maharlika
Asked:
maharlika
1 Solution
 
hdhondtCommented:
Yes, you can give Windows a fixed IP address. Every IP connection (wired, wireless...) can, and should, have a separate address, all of which can be individually set to DHCP or fixed.

If you go to network setup, click on TCP/IP and then click the Properties button, you can change the settings there.

Especially for wireless, you really should leave it set to DHCP. Different networks may have completely different settings, so, if you fix the IP address for one network, it may not work on the next one, or may even give a duplicate address conflict which would affect others on the network, too.
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
Wireless is a per network (SSID) setting (static vs dynamic ip)
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maharlikaAuthor Commented:
I don't understand how this works on windows wireless. The only option I see for putting in a fixed IP address is on the wireless adapter settings, which will change it for all wireless connections.  this means if I put in a fixed IP in one location, it won't work on wireless in another network unless I change it back to dhcp on the adapter settings.  The ipod lets me change the dhcp/fixed ip settings per ssid, but windows does not
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Craig BeckCommented:
You need to use 3rd party software to do this, such as NetSwitcher...

http://www.netswitcher.com/
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Darr247Commented:
> where you can configure the wireless connections independently?

I believe hdhondt inferred you meant "independently from the wired adapter" in which case their answer is accurate.

Microsoft's Wireless Zero Configuration service does not allow you to configure the DHCP/static IP settings separately between wireless networks, though some 3rd-party connection managers (such as those from Broadcom, Atheros or Intel) might allow that.
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akahanCommented:
Windows allows you to solve this problem, more or less.

You don't say what version of Windows you're using.  I'm going to assume XP.  Windows 7 is similar, but not EXACTLY the same.

In XP:

Start/Control Panel/Network Connections.  Right-click on the wireless network connection.  Choose Properties.
Under the General tab, choose TCP/IP.
Click the Properties button.
Under General, check "obtain an IP address automatically," and "Obtain DNS server address automatically."

Next, choose the Alternate Configuration tab (next to the General tab).
Under Alternate Configuration, enter the static IP address information that works for your troublesome wireless network: Ip address, Subnet mask, default gateway, and DNS servers.  Hit OK and exit all the way out.

Now here's what will happen:

When you attempt to connect to a wireless network, the machine will FIRST try the "General" settings:  It will try to get a connection using DHCP.  If it does, great.  If it is unable to do so, it will next try the static settings you've entered under "Alternate Configuration."  This will connect you to the network you're having trouble with, the one that only connects using a static IP address.

So nearly all the time, you'll successfully get a DHCP address; on your one crappy network, it will first attempt DHCP and fail; and will then try static.  So there will be a somewhat longer delay before it connects successfully (because it's trying and failing at DHCP first), but it'll connect after a bit.
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