Set a company wide default font on Outlook 2007 + 2010 using group policy

Hi, I need to roll out Arial 11 black as a default font to Outlook 2010 and 2007 users installs, I would like to be able to do this by Group Policy rather than a logon script.
I have seen how to create the key in a clean version of Outlook 2010, find it in the registry and export the binary key.

I need to know how to create a new (or amend) default domain policy to add the entry onto everyone’s machine registry, I am assuming that the exported key will sit in a shared network folder accessible to all.

The user base also does not have permissions to access the registry, when I have to edit or add anything from inside a user profile, I have to remove temporarily the group policy.

Could anyone walk me through a step by step approach to achieving this, as mentioned I don’t really want to add a logon script for all users as we already have a reasonable amount of these for differing departments.

Many thanks in advance for the possible solutions offered.
mercuriousu2Asked:
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David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
On a test pc with Office 2007/2010 installed
Open Outlook

    Go to Tools > Options > Mail Format > Stationery & Fonts…
    Use the Font… button to specify the size, type and colour of the font for new messages
    Use the other Font buttons to specify replies and plain text settings if necessary
    Click OK and close outlook

Open the Group Policy Management Console (Part of RSAT – download here)
Create a new Policy and open it in the Group Policy Editor

    Go to User Configuration > Preferences > Windows Settings > Registry
    You can either create the new keys yourself or use the much easier Registry Wizard
    Right Click “Registry” and choose New > Registry Wizard
        Choose Local Computer
        Navigte to the following Key
        HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftOffice12.0CommonMailSettings
HKEY_CURRENT_USERSoftwareMicrosoftOffice14.0CommonMailSettings
Registry Wizard
        Tick the values ComposeFontComplex, ComposeFontSimple, ReplyFontComplex and ReplyFontSimple
        Click Finish
    This will now import those settings into the policy. It will create nested folders (known as Collection in the GPE) for each registry key. These “Collections” are purely for administrative ease and can be renamed/moved/deleted as necessary.
(bold text office 2010,italic text office 2007
source

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mercuriousu2Author Commented:
Hi, yes I had also seen this post on the GP although it was a little lost on me.
I have added the font registry entry into the default GP now, this was with the Outlook 2010 Arial 11 font.

Although this is working now on W7 Outlook 2010 (v14) machines, it did not get picked up on our XP Outlook 2007 installs.

I repeated the process on my test machine with a Office 2007 install, open GPM and went through the wizard process of adding the registry entries to the policy.  Unfortunately this change for the XP - 2007 Outlook users is not getting applied.  I forced updates of the policy and followed up with complete re-boots but still the font change is not applying.

Anyone know why?  The v14 (office 2010) is the higher one so should this make a difference?

Thanks
David Johnson, CD, MVPOwnerCommented:
please note the differences in the locations
office12 == office 2007
office14 == office 2010

They are different.
mercuriousu2Author Commented:
I created two different registry entries as per the graphic, one was created on a Office 2010 and the other on an Office 2007 install.

I know they have a different location in the registry, but not too sure what you are getting at and how this might help me in getting the Outlook font applied on the 2007 installs?

Thanks
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