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pLop Boot Manager Identifying Boot Sector Volume Labels

Posted on 2012-03-27
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Last Modified: 2012-03-27
Experts,

I am using pLop boot manager to boot into various drives on my system. The issue is, I have a lot of drives, and it's very difficult to identify the drives from just their hex values (I have a pretty complicated setup). It seems plop reads the ID values of the drives in hex and doesn't tell you how large the drives are so I can't exactly guess. I am curious if there is a program or way to get the hex value from within windows 7 so I can then write them down and know which partition is which from within plop?

Thanks for any help! :)
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Question by:dr34m3rs
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Callandor earned 500 total points
ID: 37772612
If pLop displays the volume labels, I would go by those.  The hex values are actually determined by the order, not the OS, as described in this thread: http://www.mydellmini.com/forum/general-mac-os-x-discussion/5280-hex-values-different-drives.html
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by:dr34m3rs
ID: 37774830
It seems they are in order of how the bios places them. So I can figure it out from there. Thanks for the help :)
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