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Best Language to write standard Win32 DLL in both 32 and 64-bit

Posted on 2012-03-27
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Last Modified: 2012-04-17
First, the DLL I want to create needs to be standard DLL in BOTH 32-bit and 64-bit and have the standard calling convention like a Win32 DLL (eg. Win32 API). I DO NOT want to create a .NET assembly, and NOT an ActiveX DLL. The resulting 32-bit DLL should be able to be called from any 32-bit application that can call the Win32 API DLL. The resulting 64-bit DLL should be able to be called from any 64-bit application capable of calling a standard Win64 DLL.

QUESTIONS:
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1. Can I use .NET to write this standard 32/64-bit DLL?  
2. Can I use Visual Studio 2010 to write this standard 32/64-bit DLL?  
3. What other popular language do you suggest to write this standard 32/64-bit DLL?  

Thank you.
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Question by:deming
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athomsfere earned 500 total points
ID: 37771753
Yes, you can use Visual Studio, and I believe c++ is the defacto language for DLL writing.
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