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Mac book air, disk full doesn't launch anything

Hello,

My boss has got a mac book air, with a 80 gigabytes hard drive. he likes it because it is light and great for travelling. I have transfered his XP machine onto parallels, worked fine until now.

Parallels took snapshots. Those snapshots are taking space. So, wanting to delete them, parallels tells me, sorry, not enough disk space. There is 1 gigabyte left.

Now, the mac book air won't launch anything. No app at all. I did delete all the stuff I could delete, but I'm now sticked in a loop I can't get out of.

Please help !

I also tried copying the .Pvm file onto an hard drive, but the copy crashes too.

Thanks for trying to help...

Best regards
Adam
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adam1h
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adam1h
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2 Solutions
 
Andrew Hancock (VMware vExpert / EE MVE^2)VMware and Virtualization ConsultantCommented:
Unfortunately, this is the danger you get caught with, if you run on a snapshot.

Best Practice is to not run long time on a snapshot....

the only cure would be to use VMware Converter to Convert the machine to a new VM on USB, destroy the original, and Import the converted machine youve created.

or FREE up space.
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jhyieslaCommented:
I think that Parallels may have a convertor which may get you out of your predicament; or not. You may have to trash the whole XP machine and start over.

Snaps are NOT a backup solution. They are ONLY for creating a picture of how the VM was before you do something to it like install a new app or driver or something like that. Once you know it's either good or not, you need to either delete the snap taking the VM back to the way it was or roll it into the running VM.
A snap basically freezes the original Vm and creates a delta file that has all of the changes in it.  As the VM continues to run the delta files grows and grows and takes up disk space.  I'm not sure about Parallels, but in the VMWare world, to roll all of the changes back into the snap takes about as much disk space as the delta file itself. So if the delta files is 40 GB you need that much free space to roll it back.  You could try actually deleting the delta file from their snapshot manager, but you will lose anything he has done since the snap was taken.  In like manner it might be possible to do some manual deletes, but I'm not sure which files to delete and it's always iffy doing that.
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adam1hAuthor Commented:
Thanks guys for your comments. I'm willing to delete manually the snaphots whenvever I'll find them (looking for them right now)

I agree snapshots are useless, but it looks like parallels decided to use them without my permission (my boss might have activated them)

I will try with the VMware converter solution as soon as I got a chance to get free space, as XP won't boot right now, I can't do it.

Fingers crossed...

Adam
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jhyieslaCommented:
Be careful about manually deleting things. I'd make a good back up of the Parallels folder where all of that is stored.  Also, if you have another Mac, you might be able to install Parallels and copy over the Parallels folder that stores the VM, attach it to the parallels on the other Mac and shrink down the snap that way.
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adam1hAuthor Commented:
Hey Jhyiesla,

I won't let me copy the file, it stops copying the .pvm file after 2.91 gigabytes on 70 gigabytes to copy.

Cherry of the cake, I'm doing this remotely via teamviewer form abroad...

Argh.

Thanks for your help, will keep this in my sleeve

Adam
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adam1hAuthor Commented:
Right. we have binned the mac. Error -36, dodgy hard drive.

We have fixed it through external dis kdrive, mas os X, but it does fail still.

This was a pure nightmare.

Thanks for your help anyway

Adam
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