Reverse DNS (again)

I have a client that occasionally can not receive emails from my office.

They say that their servers require reverse DNS. I thought we had resolved the issue.

Here is part of the header from email sent through my exchange server to a yahoo account:

X-Originating-IP: [XX.XX.XXX.105]
Authentication-Results: mta1044.mail.sk1.yahoo.com  from=mail.XXXX.com; domainkeys=neutral (no sig);  from=mail.XXXX.com; dkim=neutral (no sig)
Received: from 127.0.0.1  (EHLO mail.XXXX.com) (XX.XX.XXX.105)
  by mta1044.mail.sk1.yahoo.com with SMTP; Tue, 27 Mar 2012 12:02:47 -0700
X-PMWin-Version: 3.0.1.0, Antivirus-Engine: 3.18.0, Antivirus-Data: 4.64E
Content-Class: urn:content-classes:message
MIME-Version: 1.0
Content-Type: multipart/alternative;

when I ping mail.XXXX.com I get XX.XX.XXX.105

TO my mind, reverse DNS is functioning correctly. Am I wrong here?
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hgj1357Asked:
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PapertripCommented:
when I ping mail.XXXX.com I get XX.XX.XXX.105
That is forward resolution, reverse is mapping the IP to a hostname.

Unless your ISP delegated reverse DNS to you, you will need to contact them to create a PTR record for .105 that resolves to mail.XXXX.com.

Goto http://network-tools.com/ to test resolution of your sending IP.
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systechadminConsultantCommented:
just ask your ISP to create the RDNS reocrd of the IP of the mail server, provide then IP while sending the request
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hgj1357Author Commented:
Unfortunately my ISP is AT&T.  When I call I know I'll get "PBJ  ??  I'm switching you to a dynamic IP. That should fix everything"
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PapertripCommented:
If your current ISP will not manage your reverse DNS and will not delegate authority to your nameservers, then find a new ISP.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
Have AT&T create RDNS record of XX.XX.XXX.105  or
PTR record for XX.XX.XXX.105 that resolves to mail.XXXX.com

which one?
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PapertripCommented:
The 2nd one.

PTR record for XX.XX.XXX.105 that resolves to mail.XXXX.com
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abdulalikhanCommented:
Ask your ISP to create a reverse DNS against the IP x.x.x.105 against your MX name. The reverse DNS is also known as PTR records.

This will help you to send emails to any domain who are also using reverse DNS checks. Reverse DNS checks helps you to minimize SPAM from internet.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
I have to fill out a reverse DNS form.  I need help with some of the questions

Assigned LAN/CIDR block*:  ??
Hostname and MX preference you want assigned:  ??
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PapertripCommented:
That's an... interesting form...  Are you sure it's the right one?

Assigned LAN/CIDR block*:  Ironically this is information your ISP should be providing you.

Hostname and MX preference you want assigned:  Well the hostname is mail.XXXX.com, but there is no MX record for this -- this entire question sounds like it's strictly for MX record additions.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
AT&T want to charge me $50 to get 'special' support to get the Assigned LAN/CIDR block info.  Perhaps I should just pay it and get this done?  Bar stewards!
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PapertripCommented:
I know this sounds drastic but I would be looking at other ISP's.

Not being able to just call up and say I want a PTR added for IP x to point to hostname A is pretty ridiculous.  Do you have a residential or business account?
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hgj1357Author Commented:
Its a business account, so changing would be a pain.
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PapertripCommented:
Then that's even more ridiculous, I was hoping you were going to say residential considering all the BS they are trying to put you through.

Instead of putting in the CIDR block, try putting in just the one IP you want a PTR added to.  Also if you know how many IP's you have usable, the gateway, and the range of those IP's and we can probably figure out your CIDR block.  Either way, if your ISP is even asking for YOU to provide that information is pretty silly imo.
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hgj1357Author Commented:
AT&T have always been silly. It took them five (5) full minutes to find my account with all the information from their most recent invoice.  But, the service is reliable, and that counts for us.
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PapertripCommented:
You could try calling them separately from this issue and ask solely what your CIDR block is.  It's part of your service, you are paying for support if you have a business account, and I truly can't believe they don't have that info on demand for you.
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abdulalikhanCommented:
You should be calling your Account Manager for the support instead of calling the helpline. Creating a PTR is a simple process and is being used by most of the organizations to avoid SPAM, does not need any clarification by an ISP. If they are doing it the first time then it is weird and don't looks like AT&T.
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