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top: group by command

Posted on 2012-03-27
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Last Modified: 2016-02-10
I want to see what services are running and what resources those services are taking.  When I use "top" I see a long list of processes, many with duplicate commands.  For example, I see "httpd" listed more than 10 times .

How can I group these by command, so I only see httpd once with information about memory and WCPU grouped?

I run FreeBSD.
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Question by:hankknight
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Maciej S earned 500 total points
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I'm afraid you can't do this with top.
And these are not duplicated commands - every 'httpd' is a single process (note their PIDs). Apache starts more than one process to handle incoming requests.
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