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Pentium 4 compared to modern day xeons in ghz

Posted on 2012-03-28
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
Hi all,

im trying to put together a spec for Virtualising 8 machines, currently these 8 machines are running pentium 4 3.0 ghz processors

what equivilent would i need with the modern day xeons in terms of power

i know 24ghz of p4 power wouldnt be the same as 24ghz of modern xeon power

my question is how do i compare and find a cpu with the right power to replace 8 p4s?

Thanks
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Question by:awilderbeast
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Neal58 earned 167 total points
ID: 37776153
I would imagine any new Xeon would be more than a match for your old p4's!

you may want to look into something like a dual Xeon E5620. 1 chip has 4 cores / 8 threads, so 2 chips would be 8 cores / 16 threads. more than ample i would say.
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by:awilderbeast
ID: 37776239
what about the 6 core beasts? one of those be able to do it?
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by:awilderbeast
ID: 37776243
or this? would this be able to meet
Intel Core I7-3930K 3.20GHz
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by:Bawer
Bawer earned 83 total points
ID: 37776253
As far as virtualization is concerned, here i may not insist on processor of course not to keep it aside but consider better Hard Disk Drives. You should go atleast for more 15 KRPMs or if you can buy Solid state HDDs would be more better. For the Xeon processor i certainly recommend to go for Quad Core processors.

Why i recommend above is that i am using Apps virtualized and i can see processor is not used that much as much as HDDs are busy.
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by:Robert Sutton Jr
Robert Sutton Jr earned 83 total points
ID: 37776322
I still run some of these in a few of my storage servers. The ones I assume you are running are typical P4 3.ghz(Socket 604; Intel SL72G) CPUs. If you view the link below, it will show you the difference. Mainly, there are several differences with today's Xeon's that weren't available when the 604 was in its "Hay-day". With the newer technology you get increased processing power in 1 cpu(which would be like 4 of the old ones), increased cache, smaller architecture with less power consumption.

The ones you are using now are:

Old Xeon's:                                                             Current 5620 Xeon's
 
Single core(1)                                                          Quad-core(4)                                                              
single thread(1)                                                        8
32-bit                                                                      32 or 64bit capable
130nm, (Been available since 2000)                       32nm(Been available since 2010
1Mb L2 Cache                                                         12Mb Smart Cache
87w(wattage usage)                                                 80w  
1.525v(voltage)                                                       0.750V-1.350V






Take a look here at the comparison:

http://ark.intel.com/compare/47925,27277

Hope this helps.
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by:Neal58
Neal58 earned 167 total points
ID: 37776345
hex cores would probably be overpowered. the i7 isnt a server grade processor, so you will end up losing fun stuff like ECC memory. Like I said in my first post, I think any current Xeon processor would be able to handle it, only recommended the 5620 as I have used it in many similar situations before.

good comparison chart from the_warlock as well, can help to understand the massive increase in capability since the early years!

good call on the HDD's. SSD should be seriously considered above more conventional drives
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by:Callandor
Callandor earned 83 total points
ID: 37776372
Looking at http://www.cpubenchmark.net/cpu_list.php, a Pentium 4 3.0GHz cpu scores 489.  8 x 489 = 3912, and a Xeon X5365 running at 3.0 GHz scores 3922, so this cpu, or one above it, should give you an equivalent amount of cpu power.  You can only use the clock speed to compare cpus in the same architecture family.
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by:garycase
garycase earned 84 total points
ID: 37776635
As Callandor noted, a Pentium-4 3.0GHz scores 489 on PassMark ... so that gives you a reasonable idea of what kind of "horsepower" you need to virtualize 8 of them.

A few cavests, however ...

(1)  The answer isn't just 8 x 489 => virtualization entails some overhead, so I'd allow at least a 25% bump in the total "horsepower" ... i.e. 8 x 439 x 1.25 = 4890  ==> so any CPU that scores 5,000 or above would be fine.

(2)  If you want the virtulized machines to outperform the physical ones, them bump that number up even more.

(3)  VERY IMPORTANT => Be sure the system has enough memory that all 8 of the virtulized machines can have all of their assigned RAM resident at once.    If you start too many virtual machines you'll hit a point where you're generating huge numbers of page faults ... and the entire system will slow to a crawl.     e.g. if each VM is allocated 1GB, I'd go with at least 16GB of RAM, so once 8GB was allocated to the VMs, there was still plenty of RAM left for the "real" OS.

(4)  Agree with the comment above r.e. hard drive performance.   I'd spread the virtual machines among 2 or 3 different physical drives, so disk activity among multiple VMs wouldn't cause excessive thrashing.      SSDs would be even better ... but may not be practical depending on the size of the virtual drives you need.
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by:awilderbeast
ID: 37776657
thanks guys
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