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blocking access using ipsec on AIX...

Posted on 2012-03-29
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Last Modified: 2012-03-29
ok, this is very simple in linux, but not sure on aix...

I have an AIX box with two ethernet, en0 and en1 on two different vlans, so I want, if possible, to:

Permit  access ANY-IN/OUT on ent0
Permit access ONLY from some IPs to ent1

No need to filter tcp or udo ports, only IP filter is needed.

Possible?

Thanks.
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Question by:sminfo
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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 37780680
Hi again,

IPSEC on AIX is in the bos.net.ipsec.* filesets.

The IPSEC config is best done via "smitty ipsec4".

Go to "Advanced ..." and "Configure IP Security Filter Rules".

"Add an IP Security Filter Rule" by filling in the required fields, including source addresses and interface.

Don't forget to activate the IP security device. Use "smitty ips4_start_stop" for this.

Good luck!

wmp
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by:sminfo
ID: 37780693
and that's it??  :-)
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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 37780698
Yep,

if you don't want/need advanced stuff like (IKE) VPN tunnels - that's it.

wmp
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by:sminfo
ID: 37780702
wmp, any idea on how to setup ipsec to run on startup? Or it's enable by default?
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woolmilkporc earned 500 total points
ID: 37780737
Once enabled it's present after reboot. You must explicitly disable it to get rid of the beast.

Try  "smitty ips4_start".

You'll see a choice between "Now and After Reboot" and "After Reboot". "Now" alone isn't even possible.

wmp
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by:sminfo
ID: 37780772
nice!!

But I think once you have enabled ipsec on one ethernet interfase, you have to add rules, in this case OPEN, for the other one ethernet, isn't it?
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by:woolmilkporc
ID: 37781000
You don't need such a rule, but you can configure one, if you like.

Just fill all "IP" fields with "0.0.0.0", specify the interface, leave the rest at default, including, of course, "permit" beneath "Rule Action".

Don't forget to activate updated/added rules with "/usr/sbin/mkfilt -v 4 -u" or "smitty ips4_upd_filter" -> "Activate/Update".

The above rule isn't really necessary, because the default "permit all" rule "0" stays in place. This rule is always the last one in the filter list and cannot be moved away from there. Since the filter list is processed from top to bottom the other, usually more restrictive rules will come first.
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