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How do you back up a NAS? And why go with NAS vs. a bigger server?

Posted on 2012-03-29
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Last Modified: 2012-06-27
I am used to using shadow protect to back up a server.  A new client has a NAS for the data and SBS 2011 for email / network admin.  

How do you back up the NAS? Shadow protect doesn't seem to want to back it up.

And what is the 30 second elevator pitch  for NAS vs. just more hard drives in the server?
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Joseph Daly earned 1500 total points
ID: 37781579
Most NAS require a backup program that supports NDMP in order to successfully back up the data. A lot of backup companies like symantec offer an NDMP plugin/license that will allow you to back up these targets.
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by:Joseph Daly
Joseph Daly earned 1500 total points
ID: 37781606
As far as the 30 second pitch it depends widely on the company/NAs  you are using but typically NAS

offer better expandability versus a single server
 there is little to no OS overhead on a NAS box unlike running a server with OS such as windows
A good quality NAS will have redundant everything to limit possible outages.
NAS can be used as a datastore for virtual environtments
Some nas have features like replication, snapshotting, etc.
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Author Comment

by:BeGentleWithMe-INeedHelp
ID: 37781612
xx: Thanks for the quick response!  what's your thoughts on keeping all the data on the server rather than on a seperate box, if you need / want the server for sbs / exchange anyway.

I'm waiting for storagecraft to open.  would you know if they have that add in? the client already has shadowprotect sbs license
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LVL 35

Assisted Solution

by:Joseph Daly
Joseph Daly earned 1500 total points
ID: 37781657
Do they only have the NAS and SBS server? Is there anything else in the environment. If they only have those two then I would say it could be a tossup.

Personally I would keep the file Data on the NAS just because Im used to working in environments where the exchange server only runs exchange and no other roles.
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Author Comment

by:BeGentleWithMe-INeedHelp
ID: 37781887
funny - I work on the other extreme - all on 1 box - SBS
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by:StuWhitby
StuWhitby earned 500 total points
ID: 37782384
You can't do a shadow-copy on a remote system, although it's probably possible to configure snapshotting on the NAS box itself.  However, that still doesn't give you any "off-box" backup in the event of an array failure or meteorite crashing through the server cabinet (or similar).  You need to get some sort of offsite backup set up for this system... and for your shadow "protected" server.  That's only a copy of changed data blocks that exists for the length of time that the snapshots do.  Lose the disk and you've lost all the protection as well.
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