How to add second subnet

I am looking for suggestions on the best way to add a second subnet to a physical location.  Right now we have several locations running on an MPLS network.  Each location has a 10.1.x.x/24 address assigned to it.  Location 1 would be 10.1.1.x, location 2 would be 10.1.2.x, location 3 would be 10.1.3.x, etc.

I have a location let's say 10.1.5.x that is running out of IP addresses.  I'd like to keep the 10.1.5.x subnet as their static IP range and add a second subnet for DHCP.  I'd like this to probably be 10.2.5.x/24.  What would be the easiest way to do this and still have our DHCP server assign these addresses?

Would it be to change our default vlan on our switches to 10.2.5.x/24, create vlan2 on the switches for our current 10.1.5.x/24 network, and then assign our server connected ports to vlan2?  Will this setup cause any issues since our DHCP server would be on the 10.1.5.x/24 network and we'd want him handing out 10.2.5.x/24 addresses?

Would it be best to just create a whole new /16 network for the entire location and let 10.2.1.x/16 be static and 10.2.2.x/16 be DHCP leaving room for more expansion?  I have static IP addresses for some servers that must stay the same.  Would I just create NAT rules in my MPLS router for that to point to the new addresses?
jdouthitAsked:
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TolueneCommented:
If you are using Cisco switches, you can use IP helper address to each vlan that the dhcp server is not on.  We currently have 8 Vlans and one dhcp server providing each vlan seperate Ip addresses.  The only drawback is that you will need to assign the vlan that you want each piece of equipment to reside in on the switch level.  If you have two seperate switches at the location, then even this becomes easier.  You can assign switch 1 to vlan 1 and switch 2 to vlan 2.
jdouthitAuthor Commented:
We are running HP switches.  I haven't called into support yet, but I haven't found that they have an option like this while looking through documentation.
TolueneCommented:
From global configuration mode enter the vlan context and enter the ip helper address

Switch(vlan-y)#Ip helper-address x.x.x.x

I'm not an expert on HP switches, but it seems they function very similar to Cisco switches.  The Ip helper passes along dhcp information to the ip address specified in the command.

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pergrCommented:
In principle, you do not need a new VLAN.

It is fine to have two subnets in one VLAN (although you can not have two VLAN in one subnet).

On your router/switch that has the default gateway IP (10.1.5.1/24) you can just add a secondary address (10.2.5.1/24).

On your DHCP server, just add the second range of IP addresses to the pool of addresses.


That is the simple way of doing it. Now, if you have several hundred PCs, it could make sense to seperate these into several VLANs - but that is a different issue.
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