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Recommendation for router for DS3 / T1s

Hello,

I am recreating a system that was set up by an old ISP with a new ISP, but this time using my own routers.  I am looking for recommendations for routers to use.

Here is the scenerio:

1. I have 12 point-to-point T1 circuits to various locations, all terminating at the datacenter of the ISP, being delivered to my colo cage there as a channelized DS3.
2. The ISP is also providing me a gigabit ethernet drop which will be my internet gateway.  I will be requesting a small netblock (/29), as well as a larger netblock (/24) from the ISP.
3. I will have various internet webservers also in this colo.
4. I will also have a VOIP server.  Each of the dozen T1 locations uses VOIP service, coming from the voip server at the colo (so the traffic is only via the point-to-points, never hitting the "internet".)
5. Some of the T1 locations will have public netblocks available to them, which will be sliced from the /24 block.
6. Each T1 router itself will have a public IP, so that they can be checked from the outside.  These will also come from tiny slices of the /24 block.
7. Each location will have (separate) private IP blocks, that can route to each other.  The colo also will have a private IP block.



I'm envisioning probably the best way to do this is to get a router with two ethernet ports, as well as a DS3 port.  One of the ethernet ports would go to the ISP, and its address on the small block.  I would then have the ISP route all traffic for the /24 block to this IP, letting my router handle all the division of that block.  The other ethernet port would be for the other servers at the colo (some of which might be on private netblocks, others on another subdivision of the /24 public block).

The trick is this whole system needs to be QoS aware, so that the voip traffic passes through un-hindered.

Also, it needs to know how to separate each of the channelized Ts from the DS3, and apply different netblocks and routing to them.

I have set up many a T1 router before, but never anything larger.  I'm not Cisco certified, but I can find my way around the CLI of IOS, with some help from Google. :-)

Question: What is my best, low-cost choice for a router to perform these functions?  I'll probably be looking to pick something up on Ebay, as I don't have thousands in the budget.  Old and reliable is ok!  It would be *really nice* for the ethernet ports to be gigabit, but if that's a substantial expense, I could live with 100MB.

All suggestions welcome!  Thanks!
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drtester
Asked:
drtester
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2 Solutions
 
agonza07Commented:
Personally I would go with a Cisco 3845 or something newer, but the DS3 cards on that are pretty expensive. If you want to go on the cheap side maybe a 7200, they are old and reliable and DS3 cards run for less than $100 on ebay.

http://www.cisco.com/en/US/prod/collateral/routers/ps5855/prod_brochure0900aecd8019dc1f.pdf

Call this guy up. Prices may be higher than ebay, but he supports his stuff with lifetime warranty.

Jason Simmons
Vology Data Systems
Phone 813-490-7084
Email jsimmons@vds.com
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pergrCommented:
For just routing, you can consider a Juniper M7i with the PE-4CHDS3-QPP card for channelized DS3.

You have a mixture of public and private IP addressing. Do you also want the router to do NAT, or do you have firewalls for that?
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drtesterAuthor Commented:
I do have firewalls to do NAT between the private IP blocks and the public IP blocks.  I basically need routing, with QoS.
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pergrCommented:
If you are going for ebay - buy two of them. Second hand routers definitely break down faster...

If you are not that experienced configuring, go for Juniper (JUNOS) instead of Cisco (IOS). It is more logical, and the CLI is much more "forgiving" when trying to put things together.

Long term, an MX10 or MX80 would be best, but they are new so you will not find them on ebay. Get two M7i; one as spare, for testing, learning, etc...
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