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Wireless N router that will work with a 14dBi antenna with a TNC connector

Posted on 2012-04-01
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Last Modified: 2012-06-13
I have a 14dBi antenna I purchased and need to know a make/model of a router that will work with the TNC connector cable that goes to the antenna.  Would prefer a wireless n router.  Thanks.

Here is the antenna.

http://www.simplewifi.com/hot-spot-antenna-14dbi-omni-directional-with-40ft-lmr400-tncrp.html
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Question by:jfeemster
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5 Comments
 
LVL 39

Expert Comment

by:Aaron Tomosky
ID: 37794416
When I need antenna or have questions about cables/adapters I call these guys:
http://www.l-com.com/

Very helpful and have always been able to tell me what cOnnecters things have. Give them a call.
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LVL 44

Expert Comment

by:Darr247
ID: 37794587
I'm not aware of any 11n wireless routers that use TNC connectors...  Linksys used to use Reverse Polarity TNC (RP-TNC), but about the only 11n router they make with removable antennae anymore (the WRT160NL) uses RP-SMA connectors.

L-Com's Radio to Connector cross reference is at http://www.l-com.com/content/RadioConnectorCrossReference.html
(it takes a while to load).
I only see 4 units that use TNC connectors

Microwave Data Systems iNET 900
Nurit - 3010 Wireless Credit Card Terminal
Senao - NL-2511AP Pro Plus
Wi-LAN - AWE120-24

The only type they make short adapters to from TNC is the standard N type. (see http://www.l-com.com/content/AdapterLocatorChart.html )

If it's actually an RP-TNC plug, there are a lot more choices. e.g. Cisco Aironet 1300 series.

Many manufacturers do not put removable antennae on their 11n offerings, then they don't have to worry about end users putting high gain omnis on them and stepping all over other customers' signal by using 2/3rds of the 2.4GHz band with a single wide channel (it would be, essentially, peeing in their own pool)... that's the reason Apple, Cisco and Intel don't support wide channels in the 2.4GHz band, at all (even though Linksys, a subsidiary of Cisco, does allow wide channels in the 2.4GHz band).

Anyway, it might actually turn out cheaper to get one of the previously mentioned WRT160NL routers and connect a MIMO antenna like
http://www.l-com.com/item.aspx?id=20304
to it. That should be under $100 for the whole kit, shipped.  Then sell or give the antenna you have to someone else.
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LVL 2

Author Comment

by:jfeemster
ID: 37794614
Thanks for the great information.  If i purchased a Linksys WRT54G (it has two antennas with RP-TNC connectors), would I have to add an additional antenna?

I'm trying to create an access point at a race track and need up to 1/2 mile of coverage in all directions.
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LVL 44

Accepted Solution

by:
Darr247 earned 2000 total points
ID: 37794904
I don't know what your antenna is...  14dBi just means the signal is squeezed down somewhat, to a 60 degree wedge, or so... but you can have a high-gain antenna on 1 side and a stock folding rubber ducky antenna (which emits its signal in more of a doughnut shape, with the tip of the antenna sticking through the 'doughnut hole') on the other side of a WRT54G/GS/GL, no problem.

Here's a source for WRT54GL wireless routers, by the way.

You can turn nearly any wireless router into an access point by disabling the DHCP server and connecting it to your network using one of the LAN ports instead of its WAN/Internet port.
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LVL 39

Expert Comment

by:Aaron Tomosky
ID: 37796630
For a 1mile diameter network coverage you may need something more complicated and expensive than an external antenna.

Maybe get a few meraki, let them mesh, spread them out. They integrate PayPal for access so you can charge a buck for access.
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