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Strange SQL issue

Posted on 2012-04-02
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Last Modified: 2012-04-04
I have a very strange SQL issue in a query.
2 fields exist in a table:  EmailFirstName and EmailLastName.
I created a column in the query and concatenated these to fields together.

FullName: [emailfirstname] & " " & [emaillastname]

Notice the e-f-n   and e-l-n letters are low case although the table field names are uppercase.

This query works well on PCs from China, Poland, Texas, everywhere in the world but 1 (one) PC err'd on the "emiallastname" part of the concatenated field (in Mexico).   PS.  Other's in Mexico ran OK, this is just on ONE PC.

I dissected this issue and discovered that as long as the "L" in emaillastname was uppercase, the query WOULD WORK.

Low case in all the other letters worked.

This PC was replaced with a new one (not sure, but probably all existing software replaced also).

I was happy to find, at least, a work-around... but I hate these kinds of mysteries.

Win 7, Access 2010

Can anyone shed any light on this?

Scott C
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Question by:clarkscott
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Scott McDaniel (Microsoft Access MVP - EE MVE ) earned 500 total points
ID: 37796138
May have had to do with the codepage setup for the database. Access would use that when building the query and it's possible that either (a) that machine had a different CodePage set than the other or (b) there was a problem with the CodePage or (c) there was a problem with the Windows or Office install on that machine.
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by:clarkscott
ID: 37796216
The problem existed on an older PC.  This user was given a new pc.  I'm not sure if they did an image restore from the old pc or used a "company image" to setup the new system.   I was thinking it may have something to do with "language" of some sore.

What is the "codepage"?

Thanks

Scott C
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LVL 84
ID: 37796463
The "codepage" is, basically, the "interpreter" which helps with localization of an application. Wikipedia defines it as " It consists of a table of values that describes the character set for a particular language", which is fairly accurate. Most of them are supersets of ASCII, which is just a numeric representation of a character set (i.e. A=101, B=102 etc). If that codepage were corrupted, it's entirely possible that Access would interpret your field names incorrectly, and not be able to compare them correctly.
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Expert Comment

by:Jeffrey Coachman
ID: 37796591
At a basic level, ..it just sound like this one user changed something in Windows
(Regional settings, ...etc)

Did this one PC *always* have this issue?

See here...
http://www.ascii.ca/cp852.htm
Certain (but not all) Latin characters have a "Caron" or "Acute"
The Latin Letter "L" is one such character that hast both iterations for upper and lower case.


This is why I like to keep my names consistence in their "Case"...
    FullName: [EmailFirstName] & " " & [EmailLastName]
I know VBA allows lets you "get away with" using either case, but most other languages do not.

JeffCoachman
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Author Comment

by:clarkscott
ID: 37796978
I will investigate these suggestions.  Thanks much!!
Scott C
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Author Closing Comment

by:clarkscott
ID: 37805029
I've not found anything else specific on this issue, but I believe this is the closet I'll (probably) get to a solution - or explanation.  I believe it has something to do with Windows and a language issue.  
Thanks for your response.  It's appreciated!

Scott C
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