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Linux disk full ?

Ubuntu 8 server

Filesystem            Size  Used Avail Use% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/turnkey-root
                      6.4G  3.7G  2.5G  60% /
tmpfs                 252M     0  252M   0% /lib/init/rw
udev                  247M   76K  247M   1% /dev
tmpfs                 252M     0  252M   0% /dev/shm
/dev/sda1             228M   14M  202M   7% /boot
/dev/sda6              12G  158M   11G   2% /storage

mkdir stuff
mkdir: cannot create directory `stuff': No space left on device

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Not sure to understand what the problem is (but I'm by no mean an *nix expert).

Any help appreciated
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Alexandre Takacs
Asked:
Alexandre Takacs
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1 Solution
 
pclinuxguruCommented:
what does "pwd" show?
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Alexandre TakacsCTOAuthor Commented:
/

(root dir)
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pclinuxguruCommented:
try "sudo mkdir /stuff"

Just remembered Ubuntu is funky about the root account. It should prompt your for your password (your normal password).
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Alexandre TakacsCTOAuthor Commented:
Same problem (running as root btw)

I genuinely think I am out of space - if I do a apt-get update
W: Failed to fetch http://security.debian.org/dists/squeeze/updates/contrib/binary-i386/Packages.gz  Could not open file /var/lib/apt/lists/partial/security.debian.org_dists_squeeze_updates_contrib_binary-i386_Packages - open (28: No space left on device) [IP: 149.20.20.6 80]

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But I still seem to have abut 3+ Gb free ??
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Alexandre TakacsCTOAuthor Commented:
and **sorry** this is a DEBIAN box (my bad)
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Seth SimmonsSr. Systems AdministratorCommented:
You would get access denied if it was a permissions issue.
Did you try df -hi?
Wonder what the chances are you ran out of inodes.
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pclinuxguruCommented:
What are the results of "vgdisplay"?
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Alexandre TakacsCTOAuthor Commented:
Hi again

root@core /tmp# df -hi
Filesystem            Inodes   IUsed   IFree IUse% Mounted on
/dev/mapper/turnkey-root
                        416K    416K     126  100% /
tmpfs                    63K       4     63K    1% /lib/init/rw
udev                     62K     514     62K    1% /dev
tmpfs                    63K       1     63K    1% /dev/shm
/dev/sda1               122K     207    122K    1% /boot
/dev/sda6               755K      18    755K    1% /storage
root@core /tmp# vgdisplay
  --- Volume group ---
  VG Name               turnkey
  System ID             
  Format                lvm2
  Metadata Areas        1
  Metadata Sequence No  3
  VG Access             read/write
  VG Status             resizable
  MAX LV                0
  Cur LV                2
  Open LV               2
  Max PV                0
  Cur PV                1
  Act PV                1
  VG Size               7.76 GiB
  PE Size               4.00 MiB
  Total PE              1986
  Alloc PE / Size       1786 / 6.98 GiB
  Free  PE / Size       200 / 800.00 MiB
  VG UUID               9bBMDf-PYoj-eIp3-CvVD-ciRV-Eq73-RydGj4

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Seems I'm out of inodes... not too sure how to solve that though
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Seth SimmonsSr. Systems AdministratorCommented:
Bingo.  I'm not sure if expanding the volume group will add inodes.  If not, you would have to move files off there.  If you could create another partition and format with a larger inode set then you can relocate your files there.
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pclinuxguruCommented:
You can try this:
resize2fs /dev/mapper/turnkey-root

Better yet here is a site on turnkey lvms

http://www.turnkeylinux.org/blog/extending-lvm
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Alexandre TakacsCTOAuthor Commented:
Seems I will have to learn about LVM this evening...

Thanks for helping pinpoint the problem.
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