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EXCEL 2010: Formula question

Hello,

    I have a spreadsheet that I use to track inbound calls.  I already have the formula that determines whether or not I'm understaff or over-staffed for that day simply by dividing =D25/D5 cells.  If it it's under 100% then technically I'm understaffed for that day, if it's over 100% then I'm over-staffed for that day.  This is noted on the far right of my screen shot labeled "Complete to Inbound %."

    With that said, what I'm trying to pull now, is a headway percentage for the day.  For example:  How much gain did we make based off of the total of "Total New Tickets" vs. "Total Completed Tickets" received and complete?  You'll see my example in the screenshot attached. (located to the far right) and is labled "Actual Gain %".   Wonder if someone might be able to help me figure out the formula or workaround to this?

     Your help is greatly appreciated!
test.jpg
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itsmevic
Asked:
itsmevic
2 Solutions
 
dlmilleCommented:
Please upload a sample workbook to make this a bit easier in the translation.

Cheers,

Dave
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Saqib Husain, SyedEngineerCommented:
It should simply be

Total completed tickets / Total new tickets

and would show up something like

=B20/B5

depending on the address of each of the cells.

You would have to format it as a %age in number format
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byundtCommented:
I think the metric of interest might be whether the backlog is increasing or reducing in percentage terms. So 0% would mean no change in backlog, negative numbers would be a percentage reduction in backlog, and positive numbers would be a percentage increase in backlog

From the jpg screenshot, I assume that D13 is the backlog at the end of today, while D14 is the backlog at the end of yesterday.  The percentage change in backlog can be calculated as (Yesterday's backlog - Today's backlog)/(Yesterday's backlog). This expression can be simplified to:
=D13/D14 - 1                 answer expressed as a percentage

If there is a possibility that D14 might someday be 0, then you could handle that possibility with:
=IFERROR(D13/D14-1,"Not meaningful")             answer expressed as a percentage
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itsmevicAuthor Commented:
If I were to add the total number of tickets in the que presently (300) to this would that help in determining the "actual gain %" for that day?   If that was the case then would I only need to divide the "total tickets completed" into the "total number of tickets in the que" to get a percentage of a gain for that day?  

For example, take (300) active tickets already in queue, then / that by Ticket completed that day =  ?
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byundtCommented:
If you divided the "total number of tickets completed in the day" by "the total number of tickets in the queue" you would get the percentage of tickets that are satisfied today. And if you divide the total number in the queue by the total number completed in the day, you would get the number of days it might take to exhaust the queue (assuming no more tickets come in). Both of those are interesting ratios, but neither of them includes the concept of "gain."

When you say "gain," you are really talking about a slope or rate of change. That's why I suggested dividing today's backlog by yesterday's backlog--to give the percentage gain (or loss) in backlog per day.

Are you in the position of trying to interpret "boss speak" so you can produce the desired statistics? If so, perhaps the exact words used to describe the mission might suggest a tactic.

Or are you on your own, trying to figure out useful performance metrics? In this latter case, I would find it interesting to see the number of days of backlog, the number of hours a ticket remains active, the percentage change in backlog (previously suggested in this thread), and the coverage ratio (tickets closed/new tickets from your previous question).

To determine the number of hours a ticket remains active, you would study the tickets that got closed each day. In that study, you would add up the number of hours that each ticket remains open, then divide by the number of tickets closed that day. For tickets that remain open for more than one day, you will need to decide how many hours to add for each additional day the ticket is open--this could be the number of hours of help desk operation, for example. Whether you have the data to support this calculation, I cannot say. The screen shot certainly didn't show enough, but the raw data might support such a calculation.
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itsmevicAuthor Commented:
Thank you!
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