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Linux, limitis.conf and RHEL 5.x and 6.x

Posted on 2012-04-03
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Last Modified: 2012-04-03
My limits.conf is currently empty

What is the default number of processes for a user in RHEL 5.6 and RHEL 6.x ?

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Question by:Los Angeles1
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by:mvdeveloper
mvdeveloper earned 250 total points
ID: 37801458
You can check by running ulimit -u

and in

/etc/security/limits.d

Also take a look at this article:

http://kavassalis.com/2011/03/linux-and-the-maximum-number-of-processes-threads/
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jgiordano earned 250 total points
ID: 37801477
it should be have a template like below in the code box. to see you, to see the default run a ulimit -u as the users in question -


#Each line describes a limit for a user in the form:
#
#<domain>        <type>  <item>  <value>
#
#Where:
#<domain> can be:
#        - an user name
#        - a group name, with @group syntax
#        - the wildcard *, for default entry
#        - the wildcard %, can be also used with %group syntax,
#                 for maxlogin limit
#
#<type> can have the two values:
#        - "soft" for enforcing the soft limits
#        - "hard" for enforcing hard limits
#
#<item> can be one of the following:
#        - core - limits the core file size (KB)
#        - data - max data size (KB)
#        - fsize - maximum filesize (KB)
#        - memlock - max locked-in-memory address space (KB)
#        - nofile - max number of open files
#        - rss - max resident set size (KB)
#        - stack - max stack size (KB)
#        - cpu - max CPU time (MIN)
#        - nproc - max number of processes
#        - as - address space limit
#        - maxlogins - max number of logins for this user
#        - maxsyslogins - max number of logins on the system
#        - priority - the priority to run user process with
#        - locks - max number of file locks the user can hold
#        - sigpending - max number of pending signals
#        - msgqueue - max memory used by POSIX message queues (bytes)
#        - nice - max nice priority allowed to raise to
#        - rtprio - max realtime priority
#
#<domain>      <type>  <item>         <value>
#

#*               soft    core            0
#*               hard    rss             10000
#@student        hard    nproc           20
#@faculty        soft    nproc           20
#@faculty        hard    nproc           50
#ftp             hard    nproc           0
#@student        -       maxlogins       4

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